Marg McLachlan

Network News – December 2019

Network News – December 2019

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Network News December 2019

This newsletter covers topical issues in the community sector.
In this issue:

  • Update from CNA Executive Officer, Ros Rice
  • Meet the members: Community Housing Aotearoa
  • The Importance of Having a Will
  • On Air
  • ComVoices blogs
  • Government consultations and plans
  • 2020 Charities Reporting Awards
  • Inland Revenue update
  • Campaigns / programmes / events
  • Special offer for members

We encourage you to send this newsletter out through your networks.

Update from CNA Executive Officer, Ros Rice

Tēnā koutou katoa

Community Networks Aotearoa is a growing organisation.  We are gaining new memberships and thinking a lot about what we do and how we do it.  Some of our new members are networks, but not in the way we have always had members.

Some are national organisations, that have their own countrywide networks, and they are as important to us as our smaller networks in rural or regional New Zealand.  But each membership has different needs from a National organisation and wants to be heard in different ways.

The CNA Executive Committee has decided it is time we looked at our membership and listened to what you all have to say.

With that in mind, in 2020 we will be doing membership research.  Look out for me and my colleagues travelling to your area to have a conversation with you about what are your most pressing concerns, what are ideas you would like to progress and what is it we can do that is helpful for you?

A good national office is an office that responds to your needs, so I look forward to having some great conversations next year.

Also as this is our last newsletter for 2019, can I offer you the very best of Christmas wishes.  Take time to recharge, and have a fantastic break with those you love.  See you in the New Year.

And lastly, as always, remember we’re here to help. If you’re a member of CNA and have a problem or issue, or just need some information, please don’t hesitate to contact me on (04) 472 3364 or eo@communitynetworksaotearoa.org.nz. 

Meet the Members: Community Housing Aotearoa / Nga Wharerau O Aotearoa 

Community Housing Aotearoa (CHA) is the umbrella group, or peak body, for the community housing sector. Our members provide a wide range of homes throughout New Zealand in partnership with government agencies, councils, iwi, churches, developers, community groups and others.

Our vision is for all New Zealanders to be well-housed. That means good, affordable, warm, safe homes in locations that enable individuals, whānau and communities to thrive. As a country, we all benefit when people have a place to call home. Life becomes settled and less stressful, children are able to stay in school and people in their jobs, and families are able to get the social and health services they need.

Community Housing Aotearoa staff
Community Housing Aotearoa staff, council and members.

Community housing providers are an essential part of achieving this vision. Our members work closely with local communities to provide a range of homes, including emergency shelter, affordable rentals and pathways into home ownership. The many housing organisations that make up CHA’s membership share a common goal of improving the quality of life for the people they work with, and building communities that flourish.CHA supports that work by advocating for community housing providers as essential partners with Government in addressing New Zealand’s shortage of affordable housing, and by articulating the need for a responsive housing system. We work at both a systems level, to improve policy settings and equitable access to housing, and with our members to support their delivery of quality housing and gather evidence of the real difference this makes.

A significant body of work for CHA involves The Shift Aotearoa, which advocates for governments to address housing through sustainable strategies rather than reactive and insecure policy, and involves a global re-focus on the social function of housing over and above the financial function of housing.

We know we can change lives if we work together, share a vision of what is possible for housing in New Zealand, and work to ensure the right levels of resourcing are in place to enable the change we all seek.

More information about CHA
A list of our provider members

The Importance of Having a Will

By Denise Lormans, Manager, Southland Community Law Centre
Executive Board Member, Community Networks Aotearoa

It is a sad fact that many people die without having set out a valid will.  This leaves a dreadful mess for those left behind to sift through. All adults should get a will in place once they start earning.  The will should be reviewed every three years or so to make sure it is still valid.A will should detail who the executor is (someone you trust to sort your affairs out once you die). There are set rules defined in legislation about who can inherit by automatic right as well. To exclude someone from inheriting, the will should document why they are excluded so that should they challenge the will in court, the Judge will be able to make a decision based on your wishes (providing they are lawful).

The will should also state whether the person wants to be buried or cremated.  They normally also state where they want to be buried, if that is their preference.If a person dies without a will the law will apply as set out in the Administration Act 1969.  In a time of grieving this can be a minefield for any surviving relatives.  They may need to get legal advice in order to sort it all out. Some people will qualify for free legal help from Community Law Centres.If the value of the assets of the estate is small – as in under $15,000, then the estate won’t be subject to probate and can be administered without needing to apply for “letters of administration” through the High Court.  If it is a large asset value estate however, it will have to go through probate.

Always check if the person who has died had a pre-paid funeral arrangement anywhere as well.  These are often insurance policies, but some funeral directors run these plans as well. The policy/agreement will detail what any pre-paid arrangement will cover, and what it doesn’t.

Funeral grants are available from Work and Income, but criteria do apply to those grants.  If the person died as a result of an accident, ACC may be able to provide a funeral grant as well.

Listen to Ros interview  Tim Barnett.  As well as a former Labour MP and past General Secretary of the Labour Party, Tim is now CEO of FINCAP.  We will be talking about financial capability and how to survive Christmas spending.

You can also listen to previous interviews, including Dave Kennedy, Facilitator Strategic Planning for the Green Party, Professor Michael Macaulay about ethics, lobbying and impeachment, Brenda Pilott from Social Service Providers Aotearoa on Fair Pay, Dr Ganesh Nana on Budget 2019, Sarah Doherty, about Navigator, and Tracy Martin, Minister for Children, Seniors and Internal Affairs.

ComVoices blogs

Here are the links to the latest ComVoices blogs on Community Scoop. We recommend browsing through these blogs. They are fascinating reading as always…

  • Volunteer for an inclusive future
    International Volunteer Day, on Thursday 5 December, celebrates the contribution and impact volunteers make in their community. Michelle Kitney, Chief Executive of Volunteer New Zealand says Volunteer for an Inclusive Future – E whai wāhi ai te katoa, kia tūao te tū highlights the power of volunteering to achieve SDG 10 and the pursuit of equality – including inclusion – through volunteerism.
  • A journey of change and evolution
    Parting Reflections from outgoing Co-Chair, Simon Cayley of Hui E! Community Aotearoa. This journey has involved name changes, new partnerships, the creation of community hubs, winding up organisations and founding new ones within a constantly shifting political and funding context, but always with the aim of strengthening our voluntary and community sector and ultimately enhancing the wellbeing of our communities.
  • What would a joined-up approach look like?
    What would a joined-up approach to the charity sector look like? If our messaging to consumers/clients utilised the ‘power of one’ would we get more cut through? Dianne Armstrong of Arthritis NZ, challenges us to think about greater collaboration.

Government consultations and plans

Consultations / Bills

Mental Health and Wellbeing Commission Bill: Have your say on the establishment of a mental health and wellbeing commission. The establishment of this commission seeks to improve mental health and wellbeing outcomes for New Zealanders. Closing date for submissions 11 December.

The State Sector Act will be repealed and replaced with a new Public Service Act. After its first reading, it will be examined by the Governance and Administration select committee who will hear public submissions. Input from the NGO sector will be important.

Plans / Reforms

The Disability Action Plan 2019-2023: Putting the New Zealand Strategy into action, was launched on 14 November 2019 by the Minister for Disability Issues.

The Government has announced the reform of the Residential Tenancies Act. It has stated the reform strikes a balance between protecting a landlord’s interest in their property while ensuring tenants receive fair rights. New legislation is due to be introduced to Parliament in early 2020.

2020 Charities Reporting Awards: entries open
Has your charity done a particularly good job with your financial reporting? If so, you could be recognised in the 2020 New Zealand Charity Reporting Awards.The awards were established by Chartered Accountants Australia and New Zealand (CA ANZ) in 2017 to recognise the efforts of registered charities who meet the financial reporting standards. A new category for 2020 is Innovation.

CA ANZ has released a guide to Enhancing Not-for-Profit Reporting. The guide is to support organisations in the not-for-profit and charity sector with their reporting requirements.

Inland Revenue update

Information on PAYE and investment income changes.

Not-for-profit organisations may be interested in this recent webinar covering:

  • Employer transactions move into our new system
  • PAYE in a single employer account
  • Consolidation of employer notifications
  • Improvements to new employee on-boarding
  • Investment income changes

You can view presentation slides and the webinar on demand here.

Campaigns / programmes / events

Easy Evaluation workshops 2019-2020 Learn to evaluate your projects.
Gain skills and confidence in using evaluation in your work and learn how to apply programme logic. These two-day FREE workshops are for the public health workforce and community organisations with a public health focus around New Zealand.
Find out more

Do you or your organisation have a campaign or event you would like to highlight? If so send through a brief description to info@communitynetworksaotearoa.org.nz

Special offer for members of Community Networks Aotearoa and their networks 

Facing an increase in your insurance premium? Then Community Networks Aotearoa in association with Rothbury Insurance Brokers can help!

This is a package specifically created for community groups and organisations, with extremely discounted rates.

We are pleased to offer this opportunity not only to our member organisations but to their members as well. If you, or one of your network organisations, are interested in receiving an obligation free quote, please contact us for the special code you will require and Rothbury’s contact details.

About Community Networks Aotearoa

Community Networks Aotearoa is an umbrella organisation for local community networks. Our goal is to empower and strengthen the community sector by supporting community networks across Aotearoa.

We:

  • Provide advice and support to members
  • Connect community networks nationally
  • Use our collective voice to advocate for policy change and raise awareness of issues affecting the community sector.

To find out more visit our website.

And don’t forget, we’re here to help.  If you have any problems or issues, or just need some information, please don’t hesitate to contact Ros at the CNA office on Wellington (04) 472 3364 or eo@communitynetworksaotearoa.org.nz  Our staff and our Executive Committee are here to provide support to our membership and always welcome your contact.

Copyright © 2019 Community Networks Aotearoa, All rights reserved.

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Network News November 2019

Network News November 2019

This newsletter covers topical issues in the community sector.
In this issue:

  • Update from CNA Executive Officer, Ros Rice
  • Guest column: Hidden homelessness of older people
  • Meet the members: Public Health Assn of NZ
  • On Air
  • ComVoices blogs
  • Government reforms / consultations
  • Charities Services new resources
  • Inland Revenue update
  • Campaigns / programmes / events
  • Special offer for members

We encourage you to send this newsletter out through your networks.

Update from CNA Executive Officer, Ros Rice

Tēnā koutou katoa

What can you post on Facebook that gets 2,556 people reading and 706 people engaging with it over three days?  A comment about how sick I am of the old mantra about people being asked to put all raised funding to clients only, and no overheads. Go to http://bit.ly/2NaSVfO and scroll to 1 November.

This obviously has hit a nerve; perception is one of our biggest problems.  People seem to perceive that when non-profits raise money the majority of those funds go to paying wages and administration, and trips to Guatemala, and office parties, etc. etc. etc. People who don’t work for non-profits that is!

Anyone who works for a charity knows the truth; we must have reasonable administration.  Goodness knows many of us are funded for projects but not for running the projects.

Have you ever tried to bake a cake without any ingredients?  Have you ever said you will arrange a visit with a social worker when you have no social workers?  Without resources we simply can’t provide services; and its time all these taxpayers who have no trust in us loosened up a bit.

The truth is the majority of badly-paid, dedicated, loving employees for non-profits do a great deal of extra work for absolutely nothing because they hate letting down people who are desperate for help.  Waiting lists are an inevitable result of under-resourcing and when organisations fail, it usually isn’t because of a lack of need, but often because they don’t get enough money to actually do their job.

It’s time to start asking the more important question, “Will at least 25% of my contribution go to ensure your organisation can hire staff, lease premises and ensure your organisation will be sustainable for the sake of our vulnerable community?”

If the answer is yes, they will get my donation!

And lastly, as always, remember we’re here to help. If you’re a member of CNA and have a problem or issue, or just need some information, please don’t hesitate to contact me on (04) 472 3364 or eo@communitynetworksaotearoa.org.nz. 

Guest column: 

Hidden homelessness of older people

By Dr Bev James, Centre for Research, Evaluation and Social Assessment (Cresa)

We are all familiar with newspaper reports about the housing crisis and homelessness, and even about older people living in cars because they can’t find a place to live. But what is less obvious is the ‘hidden homelessness’ older people experience. As part of research about renting among older people, we conducted 108 interviews with renters aged 55 and older living in seven areas of New Zealand, to find out whether they had experienced homelessness.

Life When Renting is a four-year research programme funded through the Ageing Well National Science Challenge.

Ros' brother John beside his caravan

John Rice beside his caravan.

We used the Statistics NZ definition of homeless, which includes living without shelter (sleeping rough or in a makeshift shelter such as a shed or garage), temporary accommodation (in a camping group or emergency accommodation), living in uninhabitable (dilapidated) housing, or sharing accommodation with others because there is nowhere else to live.

We found that 19 of our 108 participants (17.5%) had been homeless in the previous five years. Of those:

  • Two of those had been homeless more than once in the past five years
  • Over half (11) became homeless when they were aged between 55-64.
  • The rest were over 65, with three people over 70 when they became homeless.
  • All except one had never experienced homelessness before – they were homeless for the first time in later life.

13 of the 19 eventually found housing for themselves, mainly through friends and contacts in their community. However, six were still homeless at the time of interview, and all of those were paying rent.

The homeless situations they experienced ranged widely, including rough sleeping, living in a car, bus, shed, garage, sleepout, emergency accommodation in a motel, a campground, couch surfing, living in a packing shed, in commercial premises, in a barn and in a condemned house.

There were two main reasons for becoming homeless: the first was unaffordable rent; the second was their tenancy being terminated because the house was sold or the landlord or landlord’s family wanted to live in the property.  Most older tenants have private landlords, and many are on periodic tenancies, which mean that they can be given 90 days’ notice (or in some situations 42 days’ notice) to leave. It can be very stressful trying to find another rental within that time.

The most recent national level data about homelessness (2013) found that 40,658 people were homeless. Of those, 5,971 were aged 55 and older. This was almost 15% of the homeless population.

CRESA has used its research findings to develop some practical information tools.

From time to time CNA invites individuals to contribute to our newsletter as a guest columnist. The thoughts, ideas and opinions shared by guest columnists are not necessarily those of CNA. 

Meet the Members: The Public Health Association of New Zealand – Kāhui Hauora Tūmatanui o Aotearoa  

The PHA is here to promote informed public debate on health and health services. Our members formulate and evaluate health policy, promote research and disseminate knowledge relevant to the health of New Zealanders. Our mission is to be a strong and informed advocate for health and equity across New Zealand.
Prudence Stone, CE, and staff of the PHA.

Our fortnightly newsletter, the Policy Spot, is used to support informed and co-ordinated action on public health issues and encourage the development of trained and effective people working for health. We have four active local branches and three caucuses for Asian, Pacific and Māori members to engage on their population’s particular public health issues.At branch level we recently held a DHB election campaign to scorecard the candidates to inform voter decision-making. At national level, we’re currently submitting on the Arms legislation bill, pregnancy warnings on alcohol labelling, and the Ministry for the Environment’s Freshwater Plan for New Zealand.

To us, every issue should be seen through a public health lens. How good is policy if it is not analysed for the impact it will have on our wellbeing? How good is policy if it does not ensure equitable outcomes for all New Zealanders? Where there is risk to health and wellbeing, the PHA raises its voice and looks for stakeholders to raise their’s alongside us.

We recognise Te Tiriti o Waitangi as Aotearoa New Zealand’s founding document, defining respectful relationships between tangata whenua and tangata tiriti. The PHA is committed to ensuring that Te Tiriti values of respect, partnership, equality, and full participation infuse all our policies, actions and services.This means that our governance and decision-making must reflect Te Tiriti values – the specific needs of Māori, and kaupapa Māori solutions must be factored into all decision-making about public health.

Find out about joining the PHA; to discuss a public health issue, call 04 472 3060 and ask for Leah Bain, Māori Policy Advisor or Dr Prudence Stone, Chief Executive. To feature upcoming public health events or advocacy opportunities in our Policy Spot ask for Libby Grant, Communications Advisor.

Listen to Ros interview Dave Kennedy, Facilitator Strategic Planning for the Green Party and recent editor of Te Awa, the Green Party’s membership magazine. Ros talks to Dave about what non-profits can do in their working world and their outreach to make a contribution to fighting climate change and global warming.

The November interview will be with Professor Michael Macaulay, from the Victoria University School of Government, about ethics, lobbying and impeachment.

The December interview will be with Tim Barnett.  As well as a former Labour MP and past General Secretary of the Labour Party, Tim is now CEO of FINCAP.  We will be talking about financial capability and how to survive Christmas spending.

You can also listen to previous interviews, including Brenda Pilott from Social Service Providers Aotearoa on Fair Pay, Dr Ganesh Nana on Budget 2019, Sarah Doherty, about Navigator, and Tracy Martin, Minister for Children, Seniors and Internal Affairs.

ComVoices blogs

Here are the links to the latest ComVoices blogs on Community Scoop. We recommend browsing through these blogs. They are fascinating reading as always…

  • Exploiting temporary migrants
    In New Zealand, temporary migrant workers, including international students, are particularly vulnerable to exploitation, says Nicola Sutton, Chief Executive of English Language Partners NZ.
  • Home is more than a roof over our heads
    …but it’s a start. And today one of the country’s many community housing trusts opened a new housing development designed to put a warm, dry, temporary roof over some of Auckland’s many families in need. By Cushla Managh of Community Housing Aotearoa

Government reforms/ consultations

 

Consultations 

Public submissions are now being called for New Zealand Superannuation and Veteran’s Pension Legislation Amendment Bill. This omnibus bill deals with social assistance for older people. Submissions close on 1 December.

Reforms to note

Submissions on the Retirement Commissioner’s three-yearly Review of Retirement Income Policies have closed. If you would still like to share your thoughts, email review@cffc.org.nz for discussion following the delivery of the Review report and recommendations in December.

Charities Services new resources

Here are some useful new resources:

Governance information for new officers: This resource is a starting point to help you understand your role as an officer and how you can contribute to governing your charity well.

How to complete your performance report and annual return: This short, simple guide outlines what you will need to complete your performance report and annual return easily and accurately.

Inland Revenue update

KiwiSaver for employers

As an employer your main tasks for KiwiSaver are checking if your new employees are eligible to be auto-enrolled, enrolling them if they are, and making KiwiSaver deductions and contributions.

IRD has new content, navigation and design about KiwiSaver online.

Campaigns / programmes / events

Abuse in Care: Royal Commission of Inquiry
The Contextual Hearing is being held in Auckland until 8 November. You can watch the live stream here.

Child Poverty Action Group’s (CPAG) 2019 Summit – Whakamana Tāngata: Where to from here. 
Monday 18 November, Nordmeyer Lecture Theatre, Otago University, Wellington City. This year’s CPAG social welfare summit offers Government and stakeholders some answers to the question: when it comes to reducing child poverty, where to from here? Register now.

Do you or your organisation have a campaign or event you would like to highlight? If so send through a brief description to info@communitynetworksaotearoa.org.nz

Special offer for members of Community Networks Aotearoa and their networks 

Facing an increase in your insurance premium? Then Community Networks Aotearoa in association with Rothbury Insurance Brokers can help!

This is a package specifically created for community groups and organisations, with extremely discounted rates.

We are pleased to offer this opportunity not only to our member organisations but to their members as well. If you, or one of your network organisations, are interested in receiving an obligation free quote, please contact us for the special code you will require and Rothbury’s contact details.

About Community Networks Aotearoa

Community Networks Aotearoa is an umbrella organisation for local community networks. Our goal is to empower and strengthen the community sector by supporting community networks across Aotearoa.

We:

  • Provide advice and support to members
  • Connect community networks nationally
  • Use our collective voice to advocate for policy change and raise awareness of issues affecting the community sector.

To find out more visit our website.

Network News – Sep/Oct 2019

Network News September/October 2019

This newsletter covers topical issues in the community sector.
In this issue:

About Community Networks Aotearoa

Community Networks Aotearoa is an umbrella organisation for local community networks. Our goal is to empower and strengthen the community sector by supporting community networks across Aotearoa.

We:

  • Provide advice and support to members
  • Connect community networks nationally
  • Use our collective voice to advocate for policy change and raise awareness of issues affecting the community sector.

To find out more visit our website.

We encourage you to send this newsletter out through your networks.

Update from CNA Executive Officer, Ros Rice

Tēnā koutou katoa

Firstly, I would like to apologise for the lack of newsletter last month.  Sadly my brother in Invercargill died suddenly and I was away from work for some weeks.  This held up the publishing of the newsletter.

We are still basking in the reaction following our biannual joint conference that we held with The NZ Council of Christian Social Services.  Wow, conference work is exhausting but most people had a great time!  We had some amazing speakers, some amazing food, lots of amazing people, and a conference dog 🙂  Yep, a little dog in a purse, who won everybody over with her sweetness and placidity. Our outgoing staff member Sarah Doherty has written our guest column summing up the conference.

And lastly, as always, remember we’re here to help. If you’re a member of CNA and have a problem or issue, or just need some information, please don’t hesitate to contact me on (04) 472 3364 or eo@communitynetworksaotearoa.org.nz. 

Guest column: Sarah Doherty

Tatou Tatou E! The value of relationships in building wellbeing, was the joint conference recently hosted by Community Networks Aotearoa and the New Zealand Christian Council of Social Services. Held in Wellington, this was the third time that we had partnered to bring this hui to the community sector in Aotearoa New Zealand.

Designed to provide the opportunity to step away from the day-to-day demands and engage in the deeper conversations that we often don’t get time for, the conference programme included a combination of inspirational keynote presentations, dynamic panel discussions and practical workshops.

The conference opened with a keynote from Professor Cindy Kiro of Auckland University who set the scene for a challenging and inspiring two days. Cindy chaired the Welfare Expert Advisory Group, who delivered the report: Whakamana Tāngata – Restoring dignity to social security in New Zealand.

Kath Harrison, from Belong Blue Mountains in New South Wales, shared how they had worked with the community to create sustainable change in the wake of the environmental impact of devastating wildfires, and the economic pressures on the neighbourhood centres that merged to form Belong Blue Mountains.

Panapa Ehau of Hikurangi Enterprises ended the first day with an inspiring address about Business as Unusual. They work in community-led economic development in the Waiapu Valley and the wider East Coast. The Hikurangi Cannabis Company grows hemp and is developing medical cannabis in New Zealand. It’s an inspiring story.

Panel discussions covered a range of topics. The political panel included four Members of Parliament: Carmel Sepuloni, Jan Logie, Tracey Martin, and Alfred Ngaro. Chaired by Bryce Edwards, it was a lively and vigorous discussion with great questions from the floor.

Day two continued as stimulating as the first day. Sasha McMeeking of University of Canterbury discussed the idea of changing social change and challenged everyone to really think about how we work for change. Associate Professor Damon Salesa of Auckland University, closed out the conference looking to New Zealand’s Pacific Futures, and thinking critically about inclusion and diversity.

The community panel discussed how community organisations can sustain their response to exclusion and discrimination following events in Christchurch. Jayden Cromb, Liz Hawes, Anjum Rahman and Mike Reid all brought diverse perspectives to an issue that we will need to keep working on throughout New Zealand for some time to come.

Our reflections after the event with our conference partners, New Zealand Council of Christian Social Services, affirmed our thoughts that this conference was unique in its offering. It was a conversation about social justice in Aotearoa New Zealand rather than a particular specialty or sector within social services, for example, aged care, social services, vulnerable children, etc. That made for an interesting mix of perspectives, both within the programme and across the participants.

The panels brought diverse voices, the keynotes were inspiring and the workshops were packed with practical application. It’s not easy stuff that we are all grappling with and we have come away with plenty of food for thought.

We ended the conference tired and satisfied, and so very grateful to everyone who participated. We count Tatou Tatou E! a success!

Sarah

From time to time CNA invites individuals to contribute to our newsletter as a guest columnist. The thoughts, ideas and opinions shared by guest columnists are not necessarily those of CNA. 

Meet the Members:  

Otorohanga Support House Whare Awhina

The Otorohanga Support House Whare Awhina is a central hub that was created almost 30 years ago. We provide vital services to support our rurally located community. We provide a venue for voluntary groups and social service agencies to engage with their clients, to promote wellbeing, safety and positive changes and support in times of stress and crisis for the Otorohanga and the wider King County community.

We ensure that we meet our objective to provide welfare and support services that are accessible to the whole community, are community oriented, have proven accountability and ethical practices and foster an environment of mutual respect and trust. Services delivered are: counselling services, wrap-around social work, family harm support, budgeting, foodbank, community health transport and citizens advice bureau.

The Support House also supports smaller volunteer groups, government agencies, health and educational services; keeping all up-to-date with new initiatives and changes at a local, regional and national level.

Annually we engage with more than 3000 individuals. Referrals increase with local promotions and we are currently taking part in a multi-agency family harm pilot. We support the journey of the people in our community to enhance their wellbeing.

Along with the daily administration work and funding requirements, a large portion of my role is to connect with the agencies and with our community via newsletters, groups, in person and via emails and phone communication. I promote the Support House through network meetings and deliver presentations to local clubs and groups. It’s a role that I’ve now held for nine years and have grown with and learnt so much along the way!

I work with an amazing team and we are fully supported by a great Executive Committee. I would like to say, on behalf of all of the staff, that we are proud of the services we deliver.

Deb Hill
Manager

CNA and NZCCSS joint conference 

The conference is over but we have some extras for you to view.

When speakers present without notes, we don’t have their verbatim words, but wherever possible we have posted their presentations, and any notes we could get, on the Tātou tātou e! website.
See the Presentations

We have also set up a gallery so you can view some of the photos that were taken during conference.  We didn’t get as many pictures as we would have liked, but this is a great bunch of pics.
See the Gallery

Selection of images conference

Listen to Ros interview Brett Jeffrey: CEO of AUSAE on the Incorporated Societies Act currently being reviewed by Parliament.

We have three fascinating interviews coming up so listen out for them.  Ros will be interviewing Dave Kennedy, Facilitator Strategic Planning for the Green Party and recent editor of Te Awa, the Green Party’s membership magazine. Ros will be talking to Dave about what non-profits can do in their working world and their outreach to make a contribution to fighting climate change and global warming.

The November interview will be with Professor Michael Macaulay, from the Victoria University School of Government, about ethics, lobbying and impeachment.

The December interview will be with Tim Barnett.  As well as a former Labour MP and past General Secretary of the Labour Party, Tim is now CEO of FINCAP.  We will be talking about financial capability and how to survive Christmas spending.

You can also listen to previous interviews, including Brenda Pilott from Social Service Providers Aotearoa on Fair Pay, Dr Ganesh Nana on Budget 2019, Sarah Doherty, about Navigator, and Tracy Martin, Minister for Children, Seniors and Internal Affairs.

To blog, or not to blog…

Here are the links to the latest ComVoices blogs on Community Scoop. We recommend a browsing through these blogs. They are fascinating reading as always…

Government reforms/ consultations 

Consultations 

Reforms to note

  • The Incorporated Societies Act review is currently under review and MP Hon Kris Faafoi has already provided a cabinet paper on proposed changes.  You can catch up with this paper and other information here.
  • The Charities Act 2005 is being reviewed to ensure that it is effective and fit for purpose. Public consultation on the review recently closed, but you can keep up to date on the review here.
  • The Government is reviewing the New Zealand Health and Disability Sector. Read more here.
  • The Mental Health and Addiction Report has been released. Read more here.

Changes to Inland Revenue

Moving away from cheques

Inland Revenue is becoming increasingly digital. Soon this will include a move away from cheques.

From 1 March 2020, IRD will no longer accept cheques. This includes post-dated cheques (cheques dated after 1 March 2020).

Here is a link to a factsheet which outlines the range of alternative payment options to choose from and answers some Frequently Asked Questions.

Campaigns / programmes / events

Do you or your organisation have a campaign or event you would like to highlight? If so send through a brief description to info@communitynetworksaotearoa.org.nz

  • Prime Minister, you can fix equal pay.  Get involved or find out more.
  • Funding for sexual violence prevention and support services. See more here.
  • Why we need to transform our welfare system. Read more here
  • Let’s build an Aotearoa where we all learn NZ’s history, te reo is taught and celebrated widely and Tiriti is honoured. Sign the petition here. 
  • An interactive tool that you can use to find out what life is like for families on low incomes.  Pick a path here.

Special offer just for members of Community Networks Aotearoa and their networks – because we think you’re great!

Facing an increase in your insurance premium? Then Community Networks Aotearoa in association with Rothbury Insurance Brokers can help!

This is a package specifically created for community groups and organisations, with extremely discounted rates.

We are pleased to offer this opportunity not only to our member organisations but to their members as well. If you, or one of your network organisations, are interested in receiving an obligation free quote, please contact us for the special code you will require and Rothbury’s contact details.

Photo: Jason Pratt