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Network News February 2020

Network News February 2020

Kia ora koutou – This newsletter covers topical issues in the community sector.
We encourage you to send this newsletter out through your networks.
In this newsletter…
(click on text to jump straight to article)

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An Update from CNA Executive Officer Ros Rice

Tēnā koutou katoa

Welcome to 2020 with us here at C.N.A.  It’s going to be a big year.
Of course there is an election coming up in September, so watch closely to see if Government is prepared to not only support the non-profit sector, but also people living in poverty and desperation who need help to live more fulfilling and less stressful lives.
I also want to see commitment from government to talk and to listen to those who are working with and within communities.  Those who are at the coal face.  Don’t we all know how often we are told what the answers are and expected to follow blindly the funded solutions when we know for a fact that they just won’t work 
Welcome to 2020 with us here at C.N.A.  It’s going to be a big year.
Of course there is an election coming up in September, so watch closely to see if Government is prepared to not only support the non-profit sector, but also people living in poverty and desperation who need help to live more fulfilling and less stressful lives.

I also want to see commitment from government to talk and to listen to those who are working with and within communities.  Those who are at the coal face.  Don’t we all know how often we are told what the answers are and expected to follow blindly the funded solutions when we know for a fact that they just won’t work.

Also this year C.N.A’s Executive Committee have decided it is time we did a nationwide membership survey.  We want to understand who our members are, what they do, what their reach is, and what can we as a National organisation do best to meet our member’s needs.  I intend to travel to lots of our members during 2020 to have these discussions. Plans are being discussed and decided in the next month, and we will let you know how this is going to come together.

We have some other plans for 2020.  (To be revealed later.)  At the moment C.N.A’s staff is myself and my friend Patrick Davies.  In July we see the return of Lisa who has been on maternity leave to look after her divine little twin girls.   I really want to emphasise that we are keen for you to call us with any help or queries you might have.  We offer support when we are asked.

Finally 2020 will include our one-day membership Hui which will be held in Wellington in October.  As usual we will not charge our members anything to attend.  You just have to get yourselves here. Nows the time to put some of  your budget aside – the sooner you pay for your flight tickets the cheaper they will be. Book them now for the 16th October to arrive the night before or early in the morning.

Stay in touch and I hope to talk to you all soon.
Ros Rice

And lastly, as always, remember we’re here to help. If you’re a member of CNA and have a problem or issue, or just need some information, please don’t hesitate to contact me on (04) 472 3364 or eo@communitynetworksaotearoa.org.nz. 

Meet the Members –
Waimarie: Hamilton East Community House

Waimarie is a safe place where people can express their worries and ask for help.

Situated in the heart of Hamilton East at 53 Wellington Street, we serve South East Kirikiriroa, which covers Hamilton East, Hillcrest, Silverdale, Hayes Paddock and parts of Peachgrove. We are bounded by the river and the railway line of Peachgrove Road. We opened in December 2001.

Waimarie offers a range of services and activities which includes Community Education courses such as sewing and yoga, ranging from term to term. We currently offer yoga, Tai Chi, conversational French, sewing and ukulele. Within reason, and as long as we can find a suitable tutor and have enough attendees, we can organise classes in pretty much anything. There is gardening on Fridays, where volunteers work in the Community Garden under the expert eye of  our Gardening Coordinator.

We hire out our spaces to community groups and businesses at very reasonable rates. We also offer services such as legal advice, advocacy and budgeting in collaboration with Emma Miles, Craig Wills (Pukete Neighbourhood House) and the Hamilton Budgeting Advisory Trust. We employ clients recovering from serious mental illness to clean, wash cars and garden in collaboration with Integrated Recovery Services (part of the Waikato DHB)

We have recently completed quite extensive renovations, which have enlarged our spaces and allowed for different and improved activities and groups.

We love to chat with people and try to meet the needs that people bring. People come in to offer help or produce and to find connection and belonging.

An Introduction of the
Independent Childrens’ Monitor

Some of you may be aware of the newly established Independent Children’s Monitor. The role of the Independent Children’s Monitor (the Monitor) is to oversee the Oranga Tamariki system including the Oranga Tamariki (National Care Standards and Related Matters) Regulations 2018 (NCS Regulations).

The Independent Children’s Monitor monitors the system of state care, not individual children, to ensure the organisations that look after our tamariki (children) and rangatahi (young people are doing what they need to, to enable them to reach their potential and thrive.
The Monitor have published their first Report Agency Compliance with Regulations 69 and 85 of the Oranga Tamariki (National Care Standards and Related Matters) Regulations which is now available on their website.

Each agency currently being monitored was required to provide a response to the findings in the Report to the Minister for Children – view their responses here.

Regional Hui Underway – make sure you register for a hui near you if you haven’t already! Spaces are limited.

In January, the Independent Children’s Monitor, Office of the Children’s Commissioner and the Office of the Ombudsman travelled to Invercargill, Christchurch, Dunedin, Nelson and Blenheim for the first five of 18 hui around the country. In February and March, the Monitor will be hosting hui in Hokitika, Palmerston North, Rotorua, Hamilton, Porirua, Gisborne, Havelock North, Whanganui, New Plymouth, West and South Auckland, Kaitaia and Whangarei.

The purpose of the hui is to introduce the Monitor and other oversight agencies and share the mahi currently underway to strengthen the Independent Oversight of the Oranga Tamariki system. You will come away with a greater understanding of the agencies involved in the work to strengthen oversight of the Oranga Tamariki system, what their roles are, what’s coming up and how you can get involved now and into the future. This is the beginning of the Independent Children’s Monitor’s ongoing engagement.

If you are a children’s professional (whether from non-government or government – particularly in the social sector), a provider of services to tamariki and or rangatahi or local iwi the Monitor would love to see you.

If you would like to receive regular updates from the Monitor, please subscribe to updates here.

New Zealand Charity Reporting Awards 2020

Chartered Accountants Australia and New Zealand is proud to announce the 2020 New Zealand Charity Reporting Awards to recognise the efforts of registered charities meeting the financial reporting standards. The Awards will coincide with the Charity Law, Accounting & Regulation Conference for the 3rd year. To celebrate the success of the previous Awards we are introducing a new category – Innovation.

To be eligible you must enter the same report as the one filed on the charities register for your most recent financial year. Templates are available on https://charities.govt.nz.

CAANZ has released a guide to Enhancing Not-for-Profit Reporting. The guide is to support organisations in the not-for-profit and charity sector with their reporting requirements.

Interested? Click here for more information,
or contact maike.scherer@ charteredaccountantsanz.com
DEADLINE FOR ENTRIES: Midday, Friday 21st February, 2020

On Air – Listen to Ros talk about…

Vision For Ageing Conference (Te Papa, Wellington, 6-7 April )

Click here to look at the programme, and
Click here for Conference details & information.COLLABORATIVE VOICES airs on Wellington Access Radio from 10:30 – 11:00 am on the first Saturday of the month. It is then replayed up and down the country, check your local Access Radio schedules; or you can download previous episodes as a podcast.

Available interviews include
MP Paul Eagle;
Climate Change with Dave Kennedy;
Financial Capability with Tim Barnett;
Trump-Ethics-Bullying with Professor Michael Macaulay.

Volunteering New Zealand Needs Your Feedback!

Volunteering New Zealand are surveying volunteers and volunteer involving organisations to get feedback on the state of volunteering in New Zealand/Aoetearoa. Your input will help identify key issues and trends affecting volunteering. They will publish a report on their findings later in the year.

Click here to take part take  in the 2020 survey as a volunteer or an organisation or on either of the images.
Click here to download previous reports and papers on volunteering

Is She Incredible? Nominate Her Now!

Do you know an incredible young woman who’s doing something awesome? Let us know by nominating them for the Y25 list!
In 2020, the YWCA will be announcing 25 upcoming trailblazing young women who are making a change in their community and our world. So if you know someone who’s doing kick-ass things, nominate her today!

All you need to do is:

  • Nominate a young woman between 15-25 yrs old
  • Create a short video explaining why she’s great
  • Answer a few questions describing her work and/or achievements
  • You can save your entry and come back to complete it at a later time

Click here to go to the nomination form.
DEADLINE FOR ENTRIES: 8th March, 2020

Funding Collaboration in 2020

The Working Together More Fund (WTMF) supports collaborations and mergers that bring long-term benefits to non-profit organisations and the communities they serve.

Check out the eligibility criteria here, and please also consider the following points before applying:

  • Your collaborative initiative needs to deliver more than what NGOs already do – such as daily ongoing cooperation with other organisations
  • The collaboration needs to be more than simply coming together to jointly organise an event – unless the event’s purpose is focused on developing collaborations
  • The essence of our grant’s strategy is support for high quality collaboration – our website includes what we understand this to mean. Start by reviewing the ‘guidance’ we provide on examples of best-practice and high-quality collaboration
  • We assess applications on their level and quality of collaboration, and the anticipated impacts on service recipients and the organisations involved
  • We rarely exceed grants of $30,000 to support mergers and $20,000 for collaborations. If your proposal exceeds these figures, we recommend you contact us to discuss your initiative before applying.

For further info contact Bede Martin – bedemartin@xtra.co.nz or 021 230 2908
NEXT DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS: 5pm, Friday 20 March, 2020

ComVoices Blogs

Links to the latest ComVoices blogs on Community Scoop. We highly recommend the fascinating reading to be found here.

Government Consultations and Plans
Consultations / Bills

Incorporated Societies Act Review

2020 will see changes to this 1908 Act. No date is set for this but as soon as we know – you’ll be the next to find out. Once in place, there will be a transition period of up to 2½ years for organisations to implement changes.

Click here to read current information about the review.

The Law Society have published Law Commission and MBIE advisor Mark von Dadelszen’s three articles on the topic-
Part One – A Brief History of the Reform Process; the New Act As Proposed; Concluding Observations.
Part Two – Society Constitutions; Membership; Society Branches; Administration; Complaints and Grievances; Legal Capacity; Ultra Vires Actions; Costs in Legal Proceedings.
Part Three – Governance; Conflict of Interest; Statutory Enforcement of Obligations; Terminating, Restructuring & Rescuing; The Transition to the New Act; Reflections on the Reform Process.

Inland Revenue Updates

April will see the next set of changes coming into effect, i.e. IRD will no longer accept payment by cheques. Not-for-profit organisations may be interested in this recent webinar covering:

  • Employer transactions move into our new system
  • PAYE in a single employer account
  • Consolidation of employer notifications
  • Improvements to new employee on-boarding
  • Investment income changes

You can view presentation slides and the webinar on demand here.

All Your Learning & Development Opportunities

In One Place

At the end of 2019 SociaLink carried out a survey on what the Learning & Development needs of the social sector were, in this area. Although we weren’t overwhelmed with responses we pushed on and invited a selection of people to lunch to discuss our needs further. Read the results here, If you have any comments to make please email.

One of the suggestions made was for SociaLink to host all relevant organisational learning & development opportunities listed in one place. Well, we’re getting there. Take a look at our programme so far. We will be adding more as it becomes available so make sure you bookmark the page and check back occasioinally. And let us know of other relevant training for listing.

We’ve also posted our full list of training for the year in one document here.

Campaigns / Programmes / Events

Massey University Te Kunenega Ki Purehuroa  presents

Easy Evaluation Workshops 2020

Gain skills and confidence in using evaluation in your work and learn how to apply programme logic.
Easy Evaluation Workshops (Two Day)

  • Palmerston North, 11-12 February 2020, Wharerata Function Centre
  • Dunedin,                 25-26 February 2020, Scenic Hotel Southern Cross
  • Christchurch,             1-2 April 2020, Wigram Base
  • Auckland,                   5-6 May 2020, Sorrento in the Park
  • Wellington,             20-21 May 2020, The Pines Wellington

“Very approachable facilitators who had good insights into the health sector and our collective focus on better Maori health outcomes.”

These two-day FREE workshops are for the public health workforce and community organisations with a public health focus around New Zealand. Focusing on developing a logic model and using the logic model to develop an evaluation plan, the workshops provide experiential, hands-on learning opportunities and a full set of workshop notes is provided. Participants apply learning to their own public health/health promotion programme.
Courses run from 9:00am to 4:00pm. A light lunch is provided.

Designing And Analysing Feedback Forms Workshops (One Day)

  • Nelson,            12 May 2020 – Venue TBA
  • Christchurch,  13 May 2020 – Venue TBA

Feedback forms are an efficient and economical way to collect information about your programme. How well designed are your forms? Build your skills in creating good feedback questions, analysing quantitative data using excel, drawing graphs, and analysing qualitative data. This workshop is suitable for people with little or no experience with feedback forms and those who want to learn more. Courses run from 10:00am to 3:45pm. A light lunch is provided.

To register for any workshop, complete and submit the registration form here
or email us at easy.evaluation@massey.ac.nz or call Allison Li at 09 366 6136

Transition Times February 2020

TRANSITION TIMES
PLEASE CIRCULATE THIS TO ALL YOUR MEMBERS AND ASSOCIATES
DATE: February 2020
FOR EVERYONE INTERESTED IN HOUSING ISSUES
.
The UN Special Rapporteur on the right to adequate housing, Leilani Farha, is visiting New Zealand from 10-19 February, and there are several opportunities for you to engage with her during the visit on matters relevant to your work.

Ms Farha will assess positive developments in housing in New Zealand as well as challenges and gaps in the protection and promotion of the right to adequate housing. She will produce a summary of her findings at the end of her visit or shortly after, followed by a full report in due course.

Ms Farha will be meeting with a range of government agencies, as well as non-government organisations, and human rights and housing experts. Community Housing Aotearoa has been working with the Human Rights Commission, Te Matapihi and others to develop a schedule of visits that will provide Ms Farha with access to on-the-ground insights into New Zealand’s housing situation.

There are two particular areas of her work that Ms Farha will be seeking to engage on. The first is the extent to which houses in New Zealand are being used simply as a financial product rather than as great homes fostering wellbeing in communities. The second is to do with how a rights-based national housing strategy has worked in other countries and what lessons New Zealand might learn in order to ensure all New Zealanders are well-housed.

The visit is a real opportunity to show the UN Special Rapporteur what New Zealand’s housing crisis looks like for people seeking decent affordable homes, the contribution we are making to turning this situation around, and what else needs to happen.

We are working with a range of service and housing providers to offer Ms Farha the opportunity to hear directly from residents and persons facing homelessness during the afternoon of 11 February in Wellington, on the afternoon of Friday 14 February in Auckland, on Saturday 15 February in Kaitaia, and Monday 17 February in Christchurch.

Also included in the current itinerary are a small number of RSVP events including a film screening in Wellington on 11 February, and an in-depth seminar on Housing Finance and Wellbeing in Auckland on 13 February.

Any queries, please contact Brennan Rigby at brennan.rigby@communityhousing.org.nz.

If you would like to attend any of the following events, please confirm your interest by emailing support@communityhousing.org.nz.

Wellington: 10 -12 February
From 10 – 12 February Ms Farha will be in Wellington. Morning sessions involve engagement with Government. On Monday afternoon Ms Farha’s key engagements include a series of meetings with various Commissioners and independent Crown entities.

Tuesday 11 February
Tuesday afternoon includes a series of site visits around Wellington with a focus on meeting families and individuals facing housing risks and risks to their rights to housing.

Public event: Screening of award winning documentary: The Push (Sweden, 2019, 92 minutes), featuring the work of the Special Rapporteur on the right to adequate housing around the globe on the issue of financialization of housing (Director: Fredrik Gertten)
7pm, 11 February – Victoria University Wellington Lecture Hall

Ms Farha will introduce the film, with hosted Q and A
The event is free.  Please contact Support@communityhousing.org.nz to ensure a seat.

Wednesday 12 February
Wednesday afternoon includes a series of meetings on tenancy rights issues, and human rights in New Zealand broadly. This programme will also include a briefing on current housing related research.

Auckland: 13 and 14 February
Thursday 13 February includes a marae visit and a Housing Finance and Wellbeing seminar as follows.

Thursday 13 February – 3pm – University of Auckland Lecture Hall (room tbc)
Seminar:  Housing Finance and Wellbeing
The seminar will surface the connection between housing finance and wellbeing, in the context of growing recognition of the risks in the use of housing as a financial tool rather than as a home. It will help focus on the choices we have financing our housing stock to ensure wellbeing. The event is free.

For more information on this event please contact Support@communityhousing.org.nz to ensure a seat.

Auckland: Friday 14 February 3:30 to 5:30 pm (location TBC)
Meeting with civil society/advocacy organisations
In this session community, family and housing advocates will have a chance to speak with Ms Farha about their work and their concerns in the context of human rights.

Places are limited. Please contact Support@communityhousing.org.nz to express your interest.

Kaitaia: 15 February
Site visit to Kaitaia focused on meeting individuals and families facing housing risks and risks to their rights to housing.

Christchurch: Monday 17 February
Ms Farha is engaging a significant series of site visits in Christchurch. Please contact Support@communityhousing.org.nz if you are interested in being involved.

In Christchuch the itinerary includes:

  • Site visits – Inner city red zone tour with former and current residents, and site visits in various red zone areas of Christchuch focused on meeting with individuals and families facing or having faced housing risk.
  • Meeting with civil society/service organisations – places are limited. Please contact Support@communityhousing.org.nz to express your interest.
  • Site visit – Housing First homelessness services focused on meeting with individuals and families

In addition, meetings with the Mayors of Wellington, Auckland, and Christchurch are being sought.

Network News – December 2019

Network News – December 2019

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Network News December 2019

This newsletter covers topical issues in the community sector.
In this issue:

  • Update from CNA Executive Officer, Ros Rice
  • Meet the members: Community Housing Aotearoa
  • The Importance of Having a Will
  • On Air
  • ComVoices blogs
  • Government consultations and plans
  • 2020 Charities Reporting Awards
  • Inland Revenue update
  • Campaigns / programmes / events
  • Special offer for members

We encourage you to send this newsletter out through your networks.

Update from CNA Executive Officer, Ros Rice

Tēnā koutou katoa

Community Networks Aotearoa is a growing organisation.  We are gaining new memberships and thinking a lot about what we do and how we do it.  Some of our new members are networks, but not in the way we have always had members.

Some are national organisations, that have their own countrywide networks, and they are as important to us as our smaller networks in rural or regional New Zealand.  But each membership has different needs from a National organisation and wants to be heard in different ways.

The CNA Executive Committee has decided it is time we looked at our membership and listened to what you all have to say.

With that in mind, in 2020 we will be doing membership research.  Look out for me and my colleagues travelling to your area to have a conversation with you about what are your most pressing concerns, what are ideas you would like to progress and what is it we can do that is helpful for you?

A good national office is an office that responds to your needs, so I look forward to having some great conversations next year.

Also as this is our last newsletter for 2019, can I offer you the very best of Christmas wishes.  Take time to recharge, and have a fantastic break with those you love.  See you in the New Year.

And lastly, as always, remember we’re here to help. If you’re a member of CNA and have a problem or issue, or just need some information, please don’t hesitate to contact me on (04) 472 3364 or eo@communitynetworksaotearoa.org.nz. 

Meet the Members: Community Housing Aotearoa / Nga Wharerau O Aotearoa 

Community Housing Aotearoa (CHA) is the umbrella group, or peak body, for the community housing sector. Our members provide a wide range of homes throughout New Zealand in partnership with government agencies, councils, iwi, churches, developers, community groups and others.

Our vision is for all New Zealanders to be well-housed. That means good, affordable, warm, safe homes in locations that enable individuals, whānau and communities to thrive. As a country, we all benefit when people have a place to call home. Life becomes settled and less stressful, children are able to stay in school and people in their jobs, and families are able to get the social and health services they need.

Community Housing Aotearoa staff
Community Housing Aotearoa staff, council and members.

Community housing providers are an essential part of achieving this vision. Our members work closely with local communities to provide a range of homes, including emergency shelter, affordable rentals and pathways into home ownership. The many housing organisations that make up CHA’s membership share a common goal of improving the quality of life for the people they work with, and building communities that flourish.CHA supports that work by advocating for community housing providers as essential partners with Government in addressing New Zealand’s shortage of affordable housing, and by articulating the need for a responsive housing system. We work at both a systems level, to improve policy settings and equitable access to housing, and with our members to support their delivery of quality housing and gather evidence of the real difference this makes.

A significant body of work for CHA involves The Shift Aotearoa, which advocates for governments to address housing through sustainable strategies rather than reactive and insecure policy, and involves a global re-focus on the social function of housing over and above the financial function of housing.

We know we can change lives if we work together, share a vision of what is possible for housing in New Zealand, and work to ensure the right levels of resourcing are in place to enable the change we all seek.

More information about CHA
A list of our provider members

The Importance of Having a Will

By Denise Lormans, Manager, Southland Community Law Centre
Executive Board Member, Community Networks Aotearoa

It is a sad fact that many people die without having set out a valid will.  This leaves a dreadful mess for those left behind to sift through. All adults should get a will in place once they start earning.  The will should be reviewed every three years or so to make sure it is still valid.A will should detail who the executor is (someone you trust to sort your affairs out once you die). There are set rules defined in legislation about who can inherit by automatic right as well. To exclude someone from inheriting, the will should document why they are excluded so that should they challenge the will in court, the Judge will be able to make a decision based on your wishes (providing they are lawful).

The will should also state whether the person wants to be buried or cremated.  They normally also state where they want to be buried, if that is their preference.If a person dies without a will the law will apply as set out in the Administration Act 1969.  In a time of grieving this can be a minefield for any surviving relatives.  They may need to get legal advice in order to sort it all out. Some people will qualify for free legal help from Community Law Centres.If the value of the assets of the estate is small – as in under $15,000, then the estate won’t be subject to probate and can be administered without needing to apply for “letters of administration” through the High Court.  If it is a large asset value estate however, it will have to go through probate.

Always check if the person who has died had a pre-paid funeral arrangement anywhere as well.  These are often insurance policies, but some funeral directors run these plans as well. The policy/agreement will detail what any pre-paid arrangement will cover, and what it doesn’t.

Funeral grants are available from Work and Income, but criteria do apply to those grants.  If the person died as a result of an accident, ACC may be able to provide a funeral grant as well.

Listen to Ros interview  Tim Barnett.  As well as a former Labour MP and past General Secretary of the Labour Party, Tim is now CEO of FINCAP.  We will be talking about financial capability and how to survive Christmas spending.

You can also listen to previous interviews, including Dave Kennedy, Facilitator Strategic Planning for the Green Party, Professor Michael Macaulay about ethics, lobbying and impeachment, Brenda Pilott from Social Service Providers Aotearoa on Fair Pay, Dr Ganesh Nana on Budget 2019, Sarah Doherty, about Navigator, and Tracy Martin, Minister for Children, Seniors and Internal Affairs.

ComVoices blogs

Here are the links to the latest ComVoices blogs on Community Scoop. We recommend browsing through these blogs. They are fascinating reading as always…

  • Volunteer for an inclusive future
    International Volunteer Day, on Thursday 5 December, celebrates the contribution and impact volunteers make in their community. Michelle Kitney, Chief Executive of Volunteer New Zealand says Volunteer for an Inclusive Future – E whai wāhi ai te katoa, kia tūao te tū highlights the power of volunteering to achieve SDG 10 and the pursuit of equality – including inclusion – through volunteerism.
  • A journey of change and evolution
    Parting Reflections from outgoing Co-Chair, Simon Cayley of Hui E! Community Aotearoa. This journey has involved name changes, new partnerships, the creation of community hubs, winding up organisations and founding new ones within a constantly shifting political and funding context, but always with the aim of strengthening our voluntary and community sector and ultimately enhancing the wellbeing of our communities.
  • What would a joined-up approach look like?
    What would a joined-up approach to the charity sector look like? If our messaging to consumers/clients utilised the ‘power of one’ would we get more cut through? Dianne Armstrong of Arthritis NZ, challenges us to think about greater collaboration.

Government consultations and plans

Consultations / Bills

Mental Health and Wellbeing Commission Bill: Have your say on the establishment of a mental health and wellbeing commission. The establishment of this commission seeks to improve mental health and wellbeing outcomes for New Zealanders. Closing date for submissions 11 December.

The State Sector Act will be repealed and replaced with a new Public Service Act. After its first reading, it will be examined by the Governance and Administration select committee who will hear public submissions. Input from the NGO sector will be important.

Plans / Reforms

The Disability Action Plan 2019-2023: Putting the New Zealand Strategy into action, was launched on 14 November 2019 by the Minister for Disability Issues.

The Government has announced the reform of the Residential Tenancies Act. It has stated the reform strikes a balance between protecting a landlord’s interest in their property while ensuring tenants receive fair rights. New legislation is due to be introduced to Parliament in early 2020.

2020 Charities Reporting Awards: entries open
Has your charity done a particularly good job with your financial reporting? If so, you could be recognised in the 2020 New Zealand Charity Reporting Awards.The awards were established by Chartered Accountants Australia and New Zealand (CA ANZ) in 2017 to recognise the efforts of registered charities who meet the financial reporting standards. A new category for 2020 is Innovation.

CA ANZ has released a guide to Enhancing Not-for-Profit Reporting. The guide is to support organisations in the not-for-profit and charity sector with their reporting requirements.

Inland Revenue update

Information on PAYE and investment income changes.

Not-for-profit organisations may be interested in this recent webinar covering:

  • Employer transactions move into our new system
  • PAYE in a single employer account
  • Consolidation of employer notifications
  • Improvements to new employee on-boarding
  • Investment income changes

You can view presentation slides and the webinar on demand here.

Campaigns / programmes / events

Easy Evaluation workshops 2019-2020 Learn to evaluate your projects.
Gain skills and confidence in using evaluation in your work and learn how to apply programme logic. These two-day FREE workshops are for the public health workforce and community organisations with a public health focus around New Zealand.
Find out more

Do you or your organisation have a campaign or event you would like to highlight? If so send through a brief description to info@communitynetworksaotearoa.org.nz

Special offer for members of Community Networks Aotearoa and their networks 

Facing an increase in your insurance premium? Then Community Networks Aotearoa in association with Rothbury Insurance Brokers can help!

This is a package specifically created for community groups and organisations, with extremely discounted rates.

We are pleased to offer this opportunity not only to our member organisations but to their members as well. If you, or one of your network organisations, are interested in receiving an obligation free quote, please contact us for the special code you will require and Rothbury’s contact details.

About Community Networks Aotearoa

Community Networks Aotearoa is an umbrella organisation for local community networks. Our goal is to empower and strengthen the community sector by supporting community networks across Aotearoa.

We:

  • Provide advice and support to members
  • Connect community networks nationally
  • Use our collective voice to advocate for policy change and raise awareness of issues affecting the community sector.

To find out more visit our website.

And don’t forget, we’re here to help.  If you have any problems or issues, or just need some information, please don’t hesitate to contact Ros at the CNA office on Wellington (04) 472 3364 or eo@communitynetworksaotearoa.org.nz  Our staff and our Executive Committee are here to provide support to our membership and always welcome your contact.

Copyright © 2019 Community Networks Aotearoa, All rights reserved.

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Network News November 2019

Network News November 2019

This newsletter covers topical issues in the community sector.
In this issue:

  • Update from CNA Executive Officer, Ros Rice
  • Guest column: Hidden homelessness of older people
  • Meet the members: Public Health Assn of NZ
  • On Air
  • ComVoices blogs
  • Government reforms / consultations
  • Charities Services new resources
  • Inland Revenue update
  • Campaigns / programmes / events
  • Special offer for members

We encourage you to send this newsletter out through your networks.

Update from CNA Executive Officer, Ros Rice

Tēnā koutou katoa

What can you post on Facebook that gets 2,556 people reading and 706 people engaging with it over three days?  A comment about how sick I am of the old mantra about people being asked to put all raised funding to clients only, and no overheads. Go to http://bit.ly/2NaSVfO and scroll to 1 November.

This obviously has hit a nerve; perception is one of our biggest problems.  People seem to perceive that when non-profits raise money the majority of those funds go to paying wages and administration, and trips to Guatemala, and office parties, etc. etc. etc. People who don’t work for non-profits that is!

Anyone who works for a charity knows the truth; we must have reasonable administration.  Goodness knows many of us are funded for projects but not for running the projects.

Have you ever tried to bake a cake without any ingredients?  Have you ever said you will arrange a visit with a social worker when you have no social workers?  Without resources we simply can’t provide services; and its time all these taxpayers who have no trust in us loosened up a bit.

The truth is the majority of badly-paid, dedicated, loving employees for non-profits do a great deal of extra work for absolutely nothing because they hate letting down people who are desperate for help.  Waiting lists are an inevitable result of under-resourcing and when organisations fail, it usually isn’t because of a lack of need, but often because they don’t get enough money to actually do their job.

It’s time to start asking the more important question, “Will at least 25% of my contribution go to ensure your organisation can hire staff, lease premises and ensure your organisation will be sustainable for the sake of our vulnerable community?”

If the answer is yes, they will get my donation!

And lastly, as always, remember we’re here to help. If you’re a member of CNA and have a problem or issue, or just need some information, please don’t hesitate to contact me on (04) 472 3364 or eo@communitynetworksaotearoa.org.nz. 

Guest column: 

Hidden homelessness of older people

By Dr Bev James, Centre for Research, Evaluation and Social Assessment (Cresa)

We are all familiar with newspaper reports about the housing crisis and homelessness, and even about older people living in cars because they can’t find a place to live. But what is less obvious is the ‘hidden homelessness’ older people experience. As part of research about renting among older people, we conducted 108 interviews with renters aged 55 and older living in seven areas of New Zealand, to find out whether they had experienced homelessness.

Life When Renting is a four-year research programme funded through the Ageing Well National Science Challenge.

Ros' brother John beside his caravan

John Rice beside his caravan.

We used the Statistics NZ definition of homeless, which includes living without shelter (sleeping rough or in a makeshift shelter such as a shed or garage), temporary accommodation (in a camping group or emergency accommodation), living in uninhabitable (dilapidated) housing, or sharing accommodation with others because there is nowhere else to live.

We found that 19 of our 108 participants (17.5%) had been homeless in the previous five years. Of those:

  • Two of those had been homeless more than once in the past five years
  • Over half (11) became homeless when they were aged between 55-64.
  • The rest were over 65, with three people over 70 when they became homeless.
  • All except one had never experienced homelessness before – they were homeless for the first time in later life.

13 of the 19 eventually found housing for themselves, mainly through friends and contacts in their community. However, six were still homeless at the time of interview, and all of those were paying rent.

The homeless situations they experienced ranged widely, including rough sleeping, living in a car, bus, shed, garage, sleepout, emergency accommodation in a motel, a campground, couch surfing, living in a packing shed, in commercial premises, in a barn and in a condemned house.

There were two main reasons for becoming homeless: the first was unaffordable rent; the second was their tenancy being terminated because the house was sold or the landlord or landlord’s family wanted to live in the property.  Most older tenants have private landlords, and many are on periodic tenancies, which mean that they can be given 90 days’ notice (or in some situations 42 days’ notice) to leave. It can be very stressful trying to find another rental within that time.

The most recent national level data about homelessness (2013) found that 40,658 people were homeless. Of those, 5,971 were aged 55 and older. This was almost 15% of the homeless population.

CRESA has used its research findings to develop some practical information tools.

From time to time CNA invites individuals to contribute to our newsletter as a guest columnist. The thoughts, ideas and opinions shared by guest columnists are not necessarily those of CNA. 

Meet the Members: The Public Health Association of New Zealand – Kāhui Hauora Tūmatanui o Aotearoa  

The PHA is here to promote informed public debate on health and health services. Our members formulate and evaluate health policy, promote research and disseminate knowledge relevant to the health of New Zealanders. Our mission is to be a strong and informed advocate for health and equity across New Zealand.
Prudence Stone, CE, and staff of the PHA.

Our fortnightly newsletter, the Policy Spot, is used to support informed and co-ordinated action on public health issues and encourage the development of trained and effective people working for health. We have four active local branches and three caucuses for Asian, Pacific and Māori members to engage on their population’s particular public health issues.At branch level we recently held a DHB election campaign to scorecard the candidates to inform voter decision-making. At national level, we’re currently submitting on the Arms legislation bill, pregnancy warnings on alcohol labelling, and the Ministry for the Environment’s Freshwater Plan for New Zealand.

To us, every issue should be seen through a public health lens. How good is policy if it is not analysed for the impact it will have on our wellbeing? How good is policy if it does not ensure equitable outcomes for all New Zealanders? Where there is risk to health and wellbeing, the PHA raises its voice and looks for stakeholders to raise their’s alongside us.

We recognise Te Tiriti o Waitangi as Aotearoa New Zealand’s founding document, defining respectful relationships between tangata whenua and tangata tiriti. The PHA is committed to ensuring that Te Tiriti values of respect, partnership, equality, and full participation infuse all our policies, actions and services.This means that our governance and decision-making must reflect Te Tiriti values – the specific needs of Māori, and kaupapa Māori solutions must be factored into all decision-making about public health.

Find out about joining the PHA; to discuss a public health issue, call 04 472 3060 and ask for Leah Bain, Māori Policy Advisor or Dr Prudence Stone, Chief Executive. To feature upcoming public health events or advocacy opportunities in our Policy Spot ask for Libby Grant, Communications Advisor.

Listen to Ros interview Dave Kennedy, Facilitator Strategic Planning for the Green Party and recent editor of Te Awa, the Green Party’s membership magazine. Ros talks to Dave about what non-profits can do in their working world and their outreach to make a contribution to fighting climate change and global warming.

The November interview will be with Professor Michael Macaulay, from the Victoria University School of Government, about ethics, lobbying and impeachment.

The December interview will be with Tim Barnett.  As well as a former Labour MP and past General Secretary of the Labour Party, Tim is now CEO of FINCAP.  We will be talking about financial capability and how to survive Christmas spending.

You can also listen to previous interviews, including Brenda Pilott from Social Service Providers Aotearoa on Fair Pay, Dr Ganesh Nana on Budget 2019, Sarah Doherty, about Navigator, and Tracy Martin, Minister for Children, Seniors and Internal Affairs.

ComVoices blogs

Here are the links to the latest ComVoices blogs on Community Scoop. We recommend browsing through these blogs. They are fascinating reading as always…

  • Exploiting temporary migrants
    In New Zealand, temporary migrant workers, including international students, are particularly vulnerable to exploitation, says Nicola Sutton, Chief Executive of English Language Partners NZ.
  • Home is more than a roof over our heads
    …but it’s a start. And today one of the country’s many community housing trusts opened a new housing development designed to put a warm, dry, temporary roof over some of Auckland’s many families in need. By Cushla Managh of Community Housing Aotearoa

Government reforms/ consultations

 

Consultations 

Public submissions are now being called for New Zealand Superannuation and Veteran’s Pension Legislation Amendment Bill. This omnibus bill deals with social assistance for older people. Submissions close on 1 December.

Reforms to note

Submissions on the Retirement Commissioner’s three-yearly Review of Retirement Income Policies have closed. If you would still like to share your thoughts, email review@cffc.org.nz for discussion following the delivery of the Review report and recommendations in December.

Charities Services new resources

Here are some useful new resources:

Governance information for new officers: This resource is a starting point to help you understand your role as an officer and how you can contribute to governing your charity well.

How to complete your performance report and annual return: This short, simple guide outlines what you will need to complete your performance report and annual return easily and accurately.

Inland Revenue update

KiwiSaver for employers

As an employer your main tasks for KiwiSaver are checking if your new employees are eligible to be auto-enrolled, enrolling them if they are, and making KiwiSaver deductions and contributions.

IRD has new content, navigation and design about KiwiSaver online.

Campaigns / programmes / events

Abuse in Care: Royal Commission of Inquiry
The Contextual Hearing is being held in Auckland until 8 November. You can watch the live stream here.

Child Poverty Action Group’s (CPAG) 2019 Summit – Whakamana Tāngata: Where to from here. 
Monday 18 November, Nordmeyer Lecture Theatre, Otago University, Wellington City. This year’s CPAG social welfare summit offers Government and stakeholders some answers to the question: when it comes to reducing child poverty, where to from here? Register now.

Do you or your organisation have a campaign or event you would like to highlight? If so send through a brief description to info@communitynetworksaotearoa.org.nz

Special offer for members of Community Networks Aotearoa and their networks 

Facing an increase in your insurance premium? Then Community Networks Aotearoa in association with Rothbury Insurance Brokers can help!

This is a package specifically created for community groups and organisations, with extremely discounted rates.

We are pleased to offer this opportunity not only to our member organisations but to their members as well. If you, or one of your network organisations, are interested in receiving an obligation free quote, please contact us for the special code you will require and Rothbury’s contact details.

About Community Networks Aotearoa

Community Networks Aotearoa is an umbrella organisation for local community networks. Our goal is to empower and strengthen the community sector by supporting community networks across Aotearoa.

We:

  • Provide advice and support to members
  • Connect community networks nationally
  • Use our collective voice to advocate for policy change and raise awareness of issues affecting the community sector.

To find out more visit our website.

Network News – Sep/Oct 2019

Network News September/October 2019

This newsletter covers topical issues in the community sector.
In this issue:

About Community Networks Aotearoa

Community Networks Aotearoa is an umbrella organisation for local community networks. Our goal is to empower and strengthen the community sector by supporting community networks across Aotearoa.

We:

  • Provide advice and support to members
  • Connect community networks nationally
  • Use our collective voice to advocate for policy change and raise awareness of issues affecting the community sector.

To find out more visit our website.

We encourage you to send this newsletter out through your networks.

Update from CNA Executive Officer, Ros Rice

Tēnā koutou katoa

Firstly, I would like to apologise for the lack of newsletter last month.  Sadly my brother in Invercargill died suddenly and I was away from work for some weeks.  This held up the publishing of the newsletter.

We are still basking in the reaction following our biannual joint conference that we held with The NZ Council of Christian Social Services.  Wow, conference work is exhausting but most people had a great time!  We had some amazing speakers, some amazing food, lots of amazing people, and a conference dog 🙂  Yep, a little dog in a purse, who won everybody over with her sweetness and placidity. Our outgoing staff member Sarah Doherty has written our guest column summing up the conference.

And lastly, as always, remember we’re here to help. If you’re a member of CNA and have a problem or issue, or just need some information, please don’t hesitate to contact me on (04) 472 3364 or eo@communitynetworksaotearoa.org.nz. 

Guest column: Sarah Doherty

Tatou Tatou E! The value of relationships in building wellbeing, was the joint conference recently hosted by Community Networks Aotearoa and the New Zealand Christian Council of Social Services. Held in Wellington, this was the third time that we had partnered to bring this hui to the community sector in Aotearoa New Zealand.

Designed to provide the opportunity to step away from the day-to-day demands and engage in the deeper conversations that we often don’t get time for, the conference programme included a combination of inspirational keynote presentations, dynamic panel discussions and practical workshops.

The conference opened with a keynote from Professor Cindy Kiro of Auckland University who set the scene for a challenging and inspiring two days. Cindy chaired the Welfare Expert Advisory Group, who delivered the report: Whakamana Tāngata – Restoring dignity to social security in New Zealand.

Kath Harrison, from Belong Blue Mountains in New South Wales, shared how they had worked with the community to create sustainable change in the wake of the environmental impact of devastating wildfires, and the economic pressures on the neighbourhood centres that merged to form Belong Blue Mountains.

Panapa Ehau of Hikurangi Enterprises ended the first day with an inspiring address about Business as Unusual. They work in community-led economic development in the Waiapu Valley and the wider East Coast. The Hikurangi Cannabis Company grows hemp and is developing medical cannabis in New Zealand. It’s an inspiring story.

Panel discussions covered a range of topics. The political panel included four Members of Parliament: Carmel Sepuloni, Jan Logie, Tracey Martin, and Alfred Ngaro. Chaired by Bryce Edwards, it was a lively and vigorous discussion with great questions from the floor.

Day two continued as stimulating as the first day. Sasha McMeeking of University of Canterbury discussed the idea of changing social change and challenged everyone to really think about how we work for change. Associate Professor Damon Salesa of Auckland University, closed out the conference looking to New Zealand’s Pacific Futures, and thinking critically about inclusion and diversity.

The community panel discussed how community organisations can sustain their response to exclusion and discrimination following events in Christchurch. Jayden Cromb, Liz Hawes, Anjum Rahman and Mike Reid all brought diverse perspectives to an issue that we will need to keep working on throughout New Zealand for some time to come.

Our reflections after the event with our conference partners, New Zealand Council of Christian Social Services, affirmed our thoughts that this conference was unique in its offering. It was a conversation about social justice in Aotearoa New Zealand rather than a particular specialty or sector within social services, for example, aged care, social services, vulnerable children, etc. That made for an interesting mix of perspectives, both within the programme and across the participants.

The panels brought diverse voices, the keynotes were inspiring and the workshops were packed with practical application. It’s not easy stuff that we are all grappling with and we have come away with plenty of food for thought.

We ended the conference tired and satisfied, and so very grateful to everyone who participated. We count Tatou Tatou E! a success!

Sarah

From time to time CNA invites individuals to contribute to our newsletter as a guest columnist. The thoughts, ideas and opinions shared by guest columnists are not necessarily those of CNA. 

Meet the Members:  

Otorohanga Support House Whare Awhina

The Otorohanga Support House Whare Awhina is a central hub that was created almost 30 years ago. We provide vital services to support our rurally located community. We provide a venue for voluntary groups and social service agencies to engage with their clients, to promote wellbeing, safety and positive changes and support in times of stress and crisis for the Otorohanga and the wider King County community.

We ensure that we meet our objective to provide welfare and support services that are accessible to the whole community, are community oriented, have proven accountability and ethical practices and foster an environment of mutual respect and trust. Services delivered are: counselling services, wrap-around social work, family harm support, budgeting, foodbank, community health transport and citizens advice bureau.

The Support House also supports smaller volunteer groups, government agencies, health and educational services; keeping all up-to-date with new initiatives and changes at a local, regional and national level.

Annually we engage with more than 3000 individuals. Referrals increase with local promotions and we are currently taking part in a multi-agency family harm pilot. We support the journey of the people in our community to enhance their wellbeing.

Along with the daily administration work and funding requirements, a large portion of my role is to connect with the agencies and with our community via newsletters, groups, in person and via emails and phone communication. I promote the Support House through network meetings and deliver presentations to local clubs and groups. It’s a role that I’ve now held for nine years and have grown with and learnt so much along the way!

I work with an amazing team and we are fully supported by a great Executive Committee. I would like to say, on behalf of all of the staff, that we are proud of the services we deliver.

Deb Hill
Manager

CNA and NZCCSS joint conference 

The conference is over but we have some extras for you to view.

When speakers present without notes, we don’t have their verbatim words, but wherever possible we have posted their presentations, and any notes we could get, on the Tātou tātou e! website.
See the Presentations

We have also set up a gallery so you can view some of the photos that were taken during conference.  We didn’t get as many pictures as we would have liked, but this is a great bunch of pics.
See the Gallery

Selection of images conference

Listen to Ros interview Brett Jeffrey: CEO of AUSAE on the Incorporated Societies Act currently being reviewed by Parliament.

We have three fascinating interviews coming up so listen out for them.  Ros will be interviewing Dave Kennedy, Facilitator Strategic Planning for the Green Party and recent editor of Te Awa, the Green Party’s membership magazine. Ros will be talking to Dave about what non-profits can do in their working world and their outreach to make a contribution to fighting climate change and global warming.

The November interview will be with Professor Michael Macaulay, from the Victoria University School of Government, about ethics, lobbying and impeachment.

The December interview will be with Tim Barnett.  As well as a former Labour MP and past General Secretary of the Labour Party, Tim is now CEO of FINCAP.  We will be talking about financial capability and how to survive Christmas spending.

You can also listen to previous interviews, including Brenda Pilott from Social Service Providers Aotearoa on Fair Pay, Dr Ganesh Nana on Budget 2019, Sarah Doherty, about Navigator, and Tracy Martin, Minister for Children, Seniors and Internal Affairs.

To blog, or not to blog…

Here are the links to the latest ComVoices blogs on Community Scoop. We recommend a browsing through these blogs. They are fascinating reading as always…

Government reforms/ consultations 

Consultations 

Reforms to note

  • The Incorporated Societies Act review is currently under review and MP Hon Kris Faafoi has already provided a cabinet paper on proposed changes.  You can catch up with this paper and other information here.
  • The Charities Act 2005 is being reviewed to ensure that it is effective and fit for purpose. Public consultation on the review recently closed, but you can keep up to date on the review here.
  • The Government is reviewing the New Zealand Health and Disability Sector. Read more here.
  • The Mental Health and Addiction Report has been released. Read more here.

Changes to Inland Revenue

Moving away from cheques

Inland Revenue is becoming increasingly digital. Soon this will include a move away from cheques.

From 1 March 2020, IRD will no longer accept cheques. This includes post-dated cheques (cheques dated after 1 March 2020).

Here is a link to a factsheet which outlines the range of alternative payment options to choose from and answers some Frequently Asked Questions.

Campaigns / programmes / events

Do you or your organisation have a campaign or event you would like to highlight? If so send through a brief description to info@communitynetworksaotearoa.org.nz

  • Prime Minister, you can fix equal pay.  Get involved or find out more.
  • Funding for sexual violence prevention and support services. See more here.
  • Why we need to transform our welfare system. Read more here
  • Let’s build an Aotearoa where we all learn NZ’s history, te reo is taught and celebrated widely and Tiriti is honoured. Sign the petition here. 
  • An interactive tool that you can use to find out what life is like for families on low incomes.  Pick a path here.

Special offer just for members of Community Networks Aotearoa and their networks – because we think you’re great!

Facing an increase in your insurance premium? Then Community Networks Aotearoa in association with Rothbury Insurance Brokers can help!

This is a package specifically created for community groups and organisations, with extremely discounted rates.

We are pleased to offer this opportunity not only to our member organisations but to their members as well. If you, or one of your network organisations, are interested in receiving an obligation free quote, please contact us for the special code you will require and Rothbury’s contact details.

Network News – August 2019

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Network News August 2019

This newsletter covers topical issues in the community sector. In this newsletter:

  • Update from CNA Executive Officer, Ros Rice
  • Guest column – Brett Jeffrey (AUSAE) The Incorporated Societies Act.
  • Meet the members: Neighbourhood Support New Zealand
  • Notice of CNA AGM
  • CNA and NZCCSS joint conference 27th and 28th Aug 2019
  • On Air
  • To blog, or not to blog
  • Government reforms/consultations
  • Campaigns / programmes / events
  • Special offer for members

About Community Networks Aotearoa

Community Networks Aotearoa is an umbrella organisation for local community networks. Our goal is to empower and strengthen the community sector by supporting community networks across Aotearoa.

We:

  • Provide advice and support to members
  • Connect community networks nationally
  • Use our collective voice to advocate for policy change and raise awareness of issues affecting the community sector

To find out more visit our website here.

We encourage you to send this newsletter our through your networks

Update from CNA Executive Officer, Ros Rice

Tēnā Koutou Katoa

The last three weeks are upon us, and we need to encourage you strongly to remember to register for our conference.
CNA and the NZ Council of Christian Social Services are holding our joint conference on the 27th and 28th August 2019 in Wellington. Everyone is welcome. The theme this year is Tātou tātou e (all of us together): “The value of relationships in building wellbeing.”  If you can’t make it, how about someone else, staff? Trustee?  Board member?  To find out more or register, click here

And lastly, as always, remember we’re here to help. If you’re a member of CNA and have a problem or issue, or just need some information, please don’t hesitate to contact me on (04) 472 3364 or eo@communitynetworksaotearoa.org.nz. 

Guest column: Brett Jeffrey NZ CEO of AUSAE: The Incorporated Societies Act:


In 2016 MBIE released a draft version of the Incorporated Societies Act of 1908. With the ministry receiving 116 submissions it has taken multiple years to get it to the next stage – which is now.

The draft bill now is being rewritten based on these submissions and should be presented to Parliament and then select committee over the coming months. For all of us this means that a bill that was over 110 years old now grows from 29 pages to over 100 pages. But this bill is groundbreaking and will shape how other countries throughout the world legislate their not-for-profit membership sector.
The sector will finally be recognised that societies are private bodies and should be self-governing and free from an appropriate government interference. They shouldn’t distribute profits and financial benefits to the members. And most of all the societies are organisations with members who have the primary responsibility of holding the society to account. These three important points should never be overlooked in a membership organisation.
Most of the information that is in the draft bill we are doing anyway, such as holding regular annual meetings, what our purpose is. And most of all how a person must consent to become a member of the said society. As new bill should be embraced by all Incorporated societies as it brings us into the 20thcentury.

Brett Jeffery
General Manager New Zealand
Australasian Society of Association executives (AuSAE)
027 249 8677

From time to time CNA invites individuals to contribute to our newsletter as a guest columnist. The thoughts, ideas and opinions shared by guest columnists are not necessarily those of CNA. 

Meet the members:  

NEIGHBOURHOOD SUPPORT NZ
Neighbourhood Support is a nationwide community led movement that brings people and neighbourhoods together to create safe, resilient and connected communities. Over 200,000 households are part of our growing network.  We work alongside NZ Police and other partners to equip neighbourhoods to improve safety, be prepared for emergencies and support one another so that our communities are great places to live.
Address 
C/O Police National Headquarters
180 Molesworth Street
Thorndon, Wellington, 6011
New Zealand

Please direct all enquiries to: Tess Casey, CEO – 021 133 4550 or Alivia Prattas, Communications Advisor – 022 032 7200, alivia@neighbourhoodsupport.co.nz

Neighbourhood Support New Zealand is ushering in a new chapter with the launch of a new logo at their National Conference on July 1st and 2nd in Wellington.
An iconic part of Kiwi streets and neighbourhoods for the past two decades, Neighbourhood Support New Zealand has ushered in a new chapter with the launch of a fresh logo in July.
“There has been a lot of change since we first established ourselves as a not-for-profit in the 90s.  Our members felt that it was time to ensure the ‘face’ of Neighbourhood Support kept up with where we are headed as an organisation,” says Louise Grevel, Chair for Neighbourhood Support New Zealand.
The new logo is a colourful update of the existing design. The latest design features a nod to the country’s emergency services partners, as well as a better representation of the neighbours, members and supporters who make up the growing organisation.
The updated logo also features a koru pattern which reflects the important place of taha Maori in Aotearoa New Zealand. The colours chosen symbolise Neighbourhood Support’s vision of inclusive communities, where everyone is welcome and belongs while the blue colour represents their ongoing partnership with New Zealand Police.
“The bright colours reflect the positivity and energy that is created when people work together to create safer, caring and more connected communities,” says Tess Casey, Neighbourhood Support NZ CEO.
“The rebrand is an exciting opportunity to better reflect the increasing number of people we support.  Our feedback shows that New Zealanders want to be part of neighbourhoods where people know and support each other.  Increasing numbers of people are reporting that they feel isolated or lonely, so knowing that you are a part of a neighbourhood that looks out for each other helps people feel safer and more connected.”
The official unveiling of the new logo took place at Neighbourhood Support New Zealand’s inaugural national conference – ‘CONNECT’, held at the James Cook Grand Chancellor Hotel on July 1st and 2nd in Wellington.
CONNECT was a priceless opportunity to bring Neighbourhood Support New Zealand’s members, volunteers, supporters, Police and other partners together under one roof to network, learn, and be inspired to create safer, more resilient and connected communities.
About 100 participants and speakers took part in this year’s event including Police from across New Zealand, special guests from Queensland Police Services, Maria Bennett – CEO of Neighbourhood Watch Australasia, and Police Minister Stuart Nash who presented the opening address.
Other highlights from the event included keynotes from Henare O’Keefe (Flaxmere Community Leader) and Blair Benefield (Ride Against Depression) and a closing address from Member of Parliament, Alfred Ngaro based in Te Atatu.
There were 8 workshops over the course of the two days participants could choose from to take part in with topics ranging from social media to fundraising and even conflict resolution. There were plenty of opportunities to bounce ideas around and of course ‘connect’ throughout the course of the conference with a strong emphasis on collaboration and networking.
In the words of Henare O’Keefe: “relationships are the real currency” – CONNECT was a rich opportunity to remember the difference we can all make through the time we give and share with others.
To learn more about how we create safer, more caring and connected streets, visit the Neighbourhood Support website here: www.neighbourhoodsupport.co.nz    

Notice of Community Networks Aotearoa AGM 

The Community Networks Aotearoa (CNA) AGM is on Tuesday 27th August, 5pm-6pm at Westpac Stadium 105 Waterloo Quay, Pipitea, Wellington.

The AGM is an important part of our organisation’s democracy so we encourage you to come along, especially if you’re a member.

The AGM is being held at the joint CNA and NZ Council of Christian Social Services conference. We hope you are able to stay for the full conference, but if you can only stay for the AGM you are not required to register for the conference to attend the AGM (there is no cost to attend the AGM).

If you are intending to attend the conference, you can register for the conference and AGM together here.

If you wish to attend the AGM only, you can register by emailing info@communitynetworksaotearoa.org.nz

Registrations are now open for the joint Community Networks Aotearoa and NZ Council of Christian Social Services 2019 conference

  • Do you want to hear what the Minister of Social Development and other high profile Ministers/MPs have to say about better supporting the community sector?
  • Do you want to explore how community-based organisations can contribute to a sustained response to exclusion and discrimination following events in Christchurch?
  • Do you want to hear more about how community organisations can build meaningful, effective relationships with the people they serve and with each other?
  • Do you want to learn more about how the Government’s focus on wellbeing affects communities and community organisations?

All of this and more will be explored at the joint conference of Community Networks Aotearoa and NZ Council of Christian Social Services.

Quick facts

  • It’s on the 27th and 28th August in Wellington.
  • The conference is earlier than usual this year – it’s now only a couple of weeks away so please get in quick and register.
  • The theme this year is Tātou tātou e (all of us together): The value of relationships in building wellbeing.

CNA members may be able to access funding to help with conference expenses. If you are a CNA member and would like to learn more, please email info@communitynetworksaotearoa.org.nz.

To find out more, or register, click here.

Click here and listen to Ros interview Brett Jeffrey: CEO of AUSAE on the Incorporated Societies Act currently being reviewed by parliament.

You can also listen to previous interviews, including Brenda  Pilott from Social Service Providers Aotearoa on Fair Pay, Dr Ganesh Nana on budget 2019, Sarah Doherty, about  Navigator, and Tracy Martin, Minister for Children, Seniors and Internal Affairs.

To blog, or not to blog…

Here are the links to the latest ComVoices blogs on Community Scoop. We recommend a browsing through these blogs. They are fascinating reading as always…

Government reforms/consultations 

Consultations 

  • Online Gambling in New Zealand.  What is important to you when it comes to regulating online gambling in New Zealand. For more information click here

Reforms to note

  • The Incorporated Societies Act review is currently under review and MP Hon Kris Faafoi has already provided a cabinet paper on proposed changes.  You can catch up with this paper and other information here.
  • The Charities Act 2005 is being reviewed to ensure that it is effective and fit for purpose. Public consultation on the review recently closed, but you can keep up to date on the review here.
  • The Government is reviewing of the New Zealand Health and Disability Sector. For more information click here.
  • The Safe and Effective Justice Programme Advisory Group – Te Uepū Hāpai i te Ora – is working on long term solutions to improve community safety and the way justice works. They released the report He Waka Roimata (A Vessel of Tears) – which provides valuable insights into public attitudes and ideas about New Zealand’s justice system, To read the report and find out more click here.
  • Child Wellbeing Strategy – the strategy will commit Government to set and report on its actions to improve the wellbeing of all children and young people. For more information click here.
  • The Mental Health and Addiction Report has been released, for more information click here.

Campaigns / programmes / events

Do you or your organisation have a campaign or event you would like to highlight? If so send through a brief description to info@communitynetworksaotearoa.org.nz

  • Inclusive Aotearoa Collective is seeking to create a collaboration of people across the country committed to building a socially inclusive Aotearoa New Zealand. To achieve this vision, they will create a National Diversity and Inclusion Strategy that can bring diverse groups together in a way that will direct and empower communities to build and strengthen actions at the regional and local level. To get involved or find out more click here.
  • CPAG’s Welfare Fit for Families campaign is about building a welfare system based on principles of compassion and caring, and the real needs of families, without stressful over-emphasis on work, and punitive, corrective methods. More information can be found here.
  • CPAG and ActionStation have launched a petition calling for a welfare system which takes seriously the real needs of people, one that is truly compassionate and kind and cares about the dignity and mana of the people of Aotearoa when they are experiencing truly tough times. You can sign the petition here.
  • Join the call to stop loansharks and introduce an interest rate cap in the Credit Contracts Legislation Amendment Bill. Click here.

Special offer just for members of Community Networks Aotearoa and their networks – because we think you’re great!

Facing an increase in your insurance premium? Then Community Networks Aotearoa in association with Rothbury Insurance Brokers can help!

This is a package specifically created for community groups and organisations, with extremely discounted rates.

We are pleased to offer this opportunity not only to our member organisations but to their members as well. If you, or one of your network organisations, are interested in receiving an obligation free quote, please contact us for the special code you will require and Rothbury’s contact details.

And don’t forget, we’re here to help.  If you have any problems or issues, or just need some information, please don’t hesitate to contact Ros at the CNA office on Wellington (04) 472 3364 or eo@communitynetworksaotearoa.org.nz  Our staff and our Executive Committee are here to provide support to our membership and always welcome your contact.

Copyright © 2019 Community Networks Aotearoa, All rights reserved.

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Network News – July 2019

Network News July 2019

This newsletter covers topical issues in the community sector. In this newsletter:

  • Update from CNA Executive Officer, Ros Rice
  • Guest column – Budget 2019, commentary from NZ Council of Christian Social Services
  • Meet the members: SociaLink
  • Notice of CNA AGM
  • CNA and NZCCSS joint conference 27th and 28th Aug 2019
  • On Air
  • To blog, or not to blog
  • Government reforms/consultations
  • Campaigns / programmes / events
  • Special offer for members

About Community Networks Aotearoa

Community Networks Aotearoa is an umbrella organisation for local community networks. Our goal is to empower and strengthen the community sector by supporting community networks across Aotearoa.

We:

  • Provide advice and support to members
  • Connect community networks nationally
  • Use our collective voice to advocate for policy change and raise awareness of issues affecting the community sector

To find out more visit our website here.

We encourage you to send this newsletter our through your networks

Update from CNA Executive Officer, Ros Rice

Tēnā Koutou Katoa

It has been interesting to process all the commentary on the Government’s budget released in May. In this newsletter we’ve included commentary from the NZ Council of Christian Social Services. Reading different commentary it’s clear there is lots of good in the budget, and well done to those in the community who have campaigned hard for such changes. But equally there is a sense that the budget is not transformational, and much, much more is needed to address the significant issues facing our communities across the country.

In saying this, it’s timely to think about the General Election coming up next year and how we can effectively push for change. In June I attended the Equality Network Hui, the purpose of the day was to hear and collect views on a strategy for the network, especially as we head into an election year. I’m on the network’s Steering Group so I’ll be involved in helping to pull it all together and will keep you updated as this work progresses.

A reminder that CNA and the NZ Council of Christian Social Services are holding our joint conference on the 27th and 28th August 2019 in Wellington. Everyone is welcome. The theme this year is Tātou tātou e (all of us together): The value of relationships in building wellbeing. To find out more or register, click here

And lastly, as always, remember we’re here to help. If you’re a member of CNA and have a problem or issue, or just need some information, please don’t hesitate to contact me on (04) 472 3364 or eo@communitynetworksaotearoa.org.nz. 

Guest column: NZ Council of Christian Social Services commentary on Budget 2019

The Coalition Government’s Wellbeing Budget represents a vision of a new way of working that will move away from prioritising economics, and put people, their families, whānau and communities at the centre of government priorities and spending, alongside a joined-up government approach to wellbeing.

Here at NZCCSS we are heartened by the 2019 Wellbeing Budget and see it as providing a hopeful start to building intergenerational wellbeing across all of New Zealand.

We acknowledge the complexity of this approach when applied to the budget process but remain positive about the inclusion of a wider set of factors beyond economic and fiscal measures in the Budget. When combined with the intergenerational approach, NZCCSS believes a wellbeing approach provides a solid basis for a more inclusive and equitable future for our country. This will take time to bed in.

Our mission calls us to improve the lives of those living in poverty and at the margins of society, and to give commitment to Te Tiriti O Waitangi. We are encouraged by new funding allocations to mental health, domestic violence, children in care, Whānau Ora, and on supporting Māori and Pasifika aspirations and other areas.This funding will make a positive difference to the lives of those struggling with complex issues, and who seek support from our social service networks.

Could the government have gone further? Yes. The ongoing constraint derived from the Budget Responsibility Rules as Dr Ganesh Nash pointed out at the CPAG post-budget event, has ‘no economic rationale’ and needs to be extended to support a truly transformative wellbeing approach and address underpinning structural issues.

$26.7 million (over four years) to community organisations is welcomed by NZCCSS but is insufficient against a backdrop of decades of underfunding, and cost pressures, particularly those around wage increases. The community NGO social service sector plays a critical role in supporting the overall wellbeing of children and their families and whānau through the delivery of services that work across the continuum of need from early intervention through to complex and intensive services. Without sufficient funding, in an environment of increased government performance expectations, the sustainability of individual services will remain in question.

All Budgets have a flagship announcement and mental health and addiction services was the standout of this budget. The Government’s flagship budget announcement went to mental health and addiction services; the traditional poor cousin of health. The announcement puts money behind Government’s acceptance of 38 of the 40 recommendations of He Ara Oranga (the report of the Inquiry into Mental Health and Addiction). All up, the investment into mental health priority is worth $1.9 billion over five years and spans health, correction, housing, justice and education. NZCCSS supports this cross government approach and level of investment but remains concerned the structural inequities that underpin many personal experiences of mental distress have not been addressed in this budget.

Summary of key parts of the Budget

In our comments, we focus on three main issues covered in our submission in January on the Budget Policy Statement:

  • First issue is the need to spend more now to support children and others in need through direct government transfers.
  • Secondly, the housing crisis is a real emergency now and needs urgent and significant capital funding from government to support community housing developments.
  • Thirdly, non-government social service organisations are the partners of government and communities in delivering wellbeing outcomes in our communities. This budget needs to increase funding because most organisations have had no funding increase for 10 years.

To keep reading click here.

From time to time CNA invites individuals to contribute to our newsletter as a guest columnist. The thoughts, ideas and opinions shared by guest columnists are not necessarily those of CNA. 

Meet the members: Liz Davies from SociaLink: Opening the Blinds to the Real Life of Us 

SociaLink, an organisation that supports and empowers the social and community sector in the western Bay of Plenty, has recently undertaken a range of research, produced videos and are commissioning an artwork to highlight community issues and the social sector that responds to these issues. SociaLink is launching the research and videos on 9 August 2019, all are welcome!

The key themes of the works are:

  • WBOP Social Issues – The Real Life of Us

    A lot of people are struggling in the western Bay of Plenty – vulnerability can come in many forms –  living in poverty, experiencing violence, struggling to find affordable and suitable housing, having a disability, being isolated etc.

  • Waiting Lists for social and health services

    The demand or need for social and health services is far higher than can be currently met by existing services.

  • Mapping the Social Sector Update, including low pay of workers research

    We have a diverse and resourceful social sector which is stretched and under stress.

Summary of Research and Videos                                   

WBOP Social Issues – The Real Life of Us

This provides an overview of the social wellbeing of people in the western Bay of Plenty e.g. health, income, employment, education, social connection etc. For example, 28% of the population in Tauranga live with a disability, 4% higher than the national average. 13,500 food parcels were given out in 2018, 25% of those to people who were working.

A video highlighting the damage and prevalence of family harm in the western Bay of Plenty will be played as part of this section of the presentation.

Clients experience of accessing social and health services

People in vulnerable circumstances often need to access a range of support services. We asked clients about their experiences of accessing a wide range of health and social services. This report looks at the enablers and barriers to accessing services. Enablers included the relationships that are formed with staff and other clients. Barriers included things like physical accessibility of services and the need for transport as well as a lack of services to meet their needs.

Waiting Lists for social and health services

The lack of services is well demonstrated by the number of social and health providers that have waiting lists for their services. For example one child/youth/whānau service had over 130 children on their waiting list and it could take between six-nine months for the child to receive the service. A foster provider had 100-200 children waiting for assessments to help with behavioural, learning and developmental conditions including foetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). The waiting list for FASD was up to two years. The waiting list for speech therapy services was from six months to two years.

As a result, many providers are providing services that they are not funded to provide. For example, two organisations provided twice the number of services they are funded for and are still not meeting the demand. Another organisation saw 178 people that was not covered by their funding contract.

Mapping the Social Sector Update, including low pay of workers research

This research describes the social sector that are delivering services to people with social/health issues or people experiencing vulnerable circumstances. The research describes the number and size of organisations, training needs of workers, the range of services that are provided, client demographics, and funding.

An issue of growing concern is the lack of pay equity for workers providing these services, given the workforce is predominantly female and as a result of a recent significant increase in salaries for social workers in government agencies e.g. Oranga Tamariki. This makes it very hard for non government organisations to attract and retain staff to deliver badly needed services. Nationally, 41% of social workers earnt between $30-50,000. Locally, 36% of workers that we surveyed earnt less than $25/hour or $53,000 or under, this includes non-clinical staff e.g. administrators. Workers were most likely to be on low pay if they worked for a Māori provider or a non-Government Organisation. Only 30% of staff received annual pay rises.

For more information on SociaLink and this work, click here.

Notice of Community Networks Aotearoa AGM 

The Community Networks Aotearoa (CNA) AGM is on Tuesday 27th August, 5pm-6pm at Westpac Stadium 105 Waterloo Quay, Pipitea, Wellington.

The AGM is an important part of our organisation’s democracy so we encourage you to come along, especially if you’re a member.

The AGM is being held at the joint CNA and NZ Council of Christian Social Services conference. We hope you are able to stay for the full conference, but if you can only stay for the AGM you are not required to register for the conference to attend the AGM (there is no cost to attend the AGM).

If you are intending to attend the conference, you can register for the conference and AGM together here.

If you wish to attend the AGM only, you can register by emailing info@communitynetworksaotearoa.org.nz

Call for AGM motions / remits 

We would like to formally call for any motions or remits, these must be received by Monday 15th July 2019, 5pm. Please note there will be no elections for the Executive Committee at the 2019 AGM, as per the constitution elections are held every two years. The next election will be held at the 2020 AGM.

Registrations are now open for the joint Community Networks Aotearoa and NZ Council of Christian Social Services 2019 conference

  • Do you want to hear what the Minister of Social Development and other high profile Ministers/MPs have to say about better supporting the community sector?
  • Do you want to explore how community-based organisations can contribute to a sustained response to exclusion and discrimination following events in Christchurch?
  • Do you want to hear more about how community organisations can build meaningful, effective relationships with the people they serve and with each other?
  • Do you want to learn more about how the Government’s focus on wellbeing affects communities and community organisations?

All of this and more will be explored at the joint conference of Community Networks Aotearoa and NZ Council of Christian Social Services.

Quick facts

  • It’s on the 27th and 28th August in Wellington.
  • The conference is earlier than usual this year – it’s now only a couple of months away so please get in quick and register.
  • The theme this year is Tātou tātou e (all of us together): The value of relationships in building wellbeing.

CNA members may be able to access funding to help with conference expenses. If you are a CNA member and would like to learn more, please email info@communitynetworksaotearoa.org.nz.

To find out more, or register, click here.

Click here and listen to Ros interview Dr Ganesh Nana on budget 2019.

You can also listen to previous interviews, including Sarah Doherty, about  Navigator, Tracy Martin, Minister for Children, Seniors and Internal Affairs, Dave Henderson on the Charities Review and Jo Cribb on a governance project she’s involved with (along with CNA).

To blog, or not to blog…

Here are the links to the latest ComVoices blogs on Community Scoop. We recommend a browsing through these blogs. They are fascinating reading as always…

Government reforms/consultations 

Consultations 

  • The Climate Change Response (Zero Carbon) Amendment Bill is open for public consultation. The closing date for submissions is Tuesday, 16 July 2019, click here for more information.

Reforms to note

  • The Charities Act 2005 is being reviewed to ensure that it is effective and fit for purpose. Public consultation on the review recently closed, but you can keep up to date on the review here.
  • The Government is reviewing of the New Zealand Health and Disability Sector. For more information click here.
  • The Safe and Effective Justice Programme Advisory Group – Te Uepū Hāpai i te Ora – is working on long term solutions to improve community safety and the way justice works. They released the report He Waka Roimata (A Vessel of Tears) – which provides valuable insights into public attitudes and ideas about New Zealand’s justice system, To read the report and find out more click here.
  • Child Wellbeing Strategy – the strategy will commit Government to set and report on its actions to improve the wellbeing of all children and young people. For more information click here.
  • The Mental Health and Addiction Report has been released, for more information click here.

Campaigns / programmes / events

Do you or your organisation have a campaign or event you would like to highlight? If so send through a brief description to info@communitynetworksaotearoa.org.nz

  • Inclusive Aotearoa Collective is seeking to create a collaboration of people across the country committed to building a socially inclusive Aotearoa New Zealand. To achieve this vision, they will create a National Diversity and Inclusion Strategy that can bring diverse groups together in a way that will direct and empower communities to build and strengthen actions at the regional and local level. To get involved or find out more click here.
  • CPAG’s Welfare Fit for Families campaign is about building a welfare system based on principles of compassion and caring, and the real needs of families, without stressful over-emphasis on work, and punitive, corrective methods. More information can be found here.
  • CPAG and ActionStation have launched a petition calling for a welfare system which takes seriously the real needs of people, one that is truly compassionate and kind and cares about the dignity and mana of the people of Aotearoa when they are experiencing truly tough times. You can sign the petition here.
  • Join the call to stop loansharks and introduce an interest rate cap in the Credit Contracts Legislation Amendment Bill. Click here.
  • Strategic Grants have a number of online and face to face training opportunities coming up, which teach the best-practice processes, strategies and skills required to successfully and sustainably access grants funding for your projects. Learn more and book online at the links below.

    Wellington Grant-Seeker Workshop 
    Wed 10 Jul 2019 9:00 am-1pm – $200 (Excl GST)

    Auckland Grant-Seeker Workshop 
    Thu 25 Jul 2019 9:00 am-1pm – $200 (Excl GST)

Special offer just for members of Community Networks Aotearoa and their networks – because we think you’re great!

Facing an increase in your insurance premium? Then Community Networks Aotearoa in association with Rothbury Insurance Brokers can help!

This is a package specifically created for community groups and organisations, with extremely discounted rates.

We are pleased to offer this opportunity not only to our member organisations but to their members as well. If you, or one of your network organisations, are interested in receiving an obligation free quote, please contact us for the special code you will require and Rothbury’s contact details.

Network News – June 2019

Network News June 2019

This newsletter covers topical issues in the community sector. In this newsletter:

  • Update from CNA Executive Officer, Ros Rice
  • Guest column – Budget 2019, what’s in it for community organisations? – Commentary by Dr Ganesh Nana
  • Meet the members: Community Waitakere with Chief Executive Mark Allen
  • Notice of CNA AGM – change of time/date
  • CNA and NZCCSS joint conference 27th and 28th Aug 2019
  • On Air
  • To blog, or not to blog
  • Government reforms/consultations
  • Campaigns / programmes / events
  • Special offer for members

About Community Networks Aotearoa

Community Networks Aotearoa is an umbrella organisation for local community networks. Our goal is to empower and strengthen the community sector by supporting community networks across Aotearoa.

We:

  • Provide advice and support to members
  • Connect community networks nationally
  • Use our collective voice to advocate for policy change and raise awareness of issues affecting the community sector

To find out more visit our website here.

We encourage you to send this newsletter our through your networks

Update from CNA Executive Officer, Ros Rice

Tēnā Koutou Katoa

Last month was Budget 2019, included in this newsletter is special commentary prepared by economist Dr Ganesh Nana on the budget and its impact on the community sector. Here at Community Networks Aotearoa we thought the budget included many positive initiatives, from much needed investment in mental health to indexing benefits to wages. However, we do not feel the budget was truly transformational. Transformation will come from addressing our tax settings to ensure fairness, and putting into action recommendations from reports such as the Welfare Working Group.

A reminder that CNA and the NZ Council of Christian Social Services are holding our joint conference on the 27th and 28th August 2019 in Wellington. Everyone is welcome. The theme this year is Tātou tātou e (all of us together): The value of relationships in building wellbeing. To find out more or register, click here

Also, please note the time and date of the Community Networks Aotearoa AGM has changed to Tuesday 27th 5pm at Westpac Stadium, more information is included in this newsletter.

And lastly, as always, remember we’re here to help. If you’re a member of CNA and have a problem or issue, or just need some information, please don’t hesitate to contact me on (04) 472 3364 or eo@communitynetworksaotearoa.org.nz. 

Guest column: Budget 2019, what’s in it for community organisations? Commentary by Dr Ganesh Nana

Dr Ganesh Nana from Berl has provided special commentary on Budget 2019 and its impact on community organisations. Click here to read

Dr Nana notes many positive aspects in the budget, including investments in mental health, child wellbeing, and supporting Māori and Pasifika. However he notes there was little to boost those supporting community infrastructure and networks, and that many of these organisations continue to operate with uncertain funding and little capacity to initiate or explore innovative programs.

Dr Nana ends his analysis by reflecting on the Government’s  fiscal ‘responsibility’ rules, which include a requirement that the Government reduce the level of Net Core Crown Debt to 20% of GDP within five years of taking office. However, many people, from economists to those working in the community, have raised concerns that these rules are hampering the Government’s ability to make sound economic decisions based on the current economic environment and invest in the areas our country desperately needs.

Dr Nana concludes his analysis by saying: “The books are sound, and fiscal ‘responsibility’ is not the challenge. The community, environment, and social deficits that have accumulated over many years are the issue and cannot be balanced by accumulating fiscal surpluses. Some talk about the need for a ‘rainy day surplus’. To which the response can only be that a rainy day surplus is no good when many in the community are already drowning.”

From time to time CNA invites individuals to contribute to our newsletter as a guest columnist. The thoughts, ideas and opinions shared by guest columnists are not necessarily those of CNA. 

Meet the members: Community Waitakere with Mark Allen

Community Waitakere has been improving the wellbeing of west Auckland for 30 years. It started as a council of social services (WADCOSS) and has over time moved into community development and ecological restoration. 

We had a very close collaborative relationship with Waitakere City Council as part of their suite of organisations that supported the different community sectors. During this time we were a key link in the Waitakere Social Wellbeing Collaboration and we hosted two very successful Community economic development conferences.

In 2010 Auckland Council was formed and we needed to reposition ourselves as our conversations with Council went both more regional and more local with a centralised community development team and the west having three local boards. (Local Boards are much stronger community boards with significant budget and responsibility for numerous activities of Council at a local level.) It has taken a while for the new model to settle with stronger departmental silos and an increased volume of contact points to engage within the Council organisation. Restructuring has also become the new norm so maintaining relationships is a large part of our work.

A core part of our service has always been a resource centre for local organisations. It has a fulltime host (Mandy) and provides networking, newsletters, shared work space and offices for community organisations and a venue for capacity building. We have three people (Shalema, Leao and Aroha) focussed on neighbourhood development and placemaking in the three western local boards. Aroha has a strong focus on te ao māori and works closely with marae and māori community organisations and our open door days that can regularly bring over 20 different organisations together. We have generally focussed our work in communities where there is a need to help bring people together or where local capacity is lower and we also support family violence reduction, housing and other social issue projects in our area. We have two people (Chris and  Sophie) who work on species and place restoration including pest and weed work in Te Atatu peninsula and other places. Bronwyn runs our ECE and school education programmes and we also have a community engagement programme (Project Twin Streams) around the lower reaches of Te wai-o-pareira (Henderson Creek) run by Simon.

Like many organisations our funding comes from numerous channels and is overseen by our funding and reporting administrator (Maj). Charlie Moore who many people know from his work in central government has been a part-time Chief Executive for a few years and has recently retired. In October 2018 I became the Chief Executive after a long career in local government into what has become a fulltime role. It’s a strong organisation, with a dedicated and talented team that is well respected. There are so many opportunities and so much work to be done.

Fore more information visit Community Waitakere.

Notice of Community Networks Aotearoa AGM – change of time/date

The Community Networks Aotearoa (CNA) AGM date and time has changed and will now be held on Tuesday 27th August, 5pm-6pm at Westpac Stadium 105 Waterloo Quay, Pipitea, Wellington.

The AGM is an important part of our organisation’s democracy so we encourage you to come along, especially if you’re a member.

The AGM is being held at the joint CNA and NZ Council of Christian Social Services conference. We hope you are able to stay for the full conference, but if you can only stay for the AGM you are not required to register for the conference to attend the AGM (there is no cost to attend the AGM).

If you are intending to attend the conference, you can register for the conference and AGM together here.

If you wish to attend the AGM only, you can register by emailing info@communitynetworksaotearoa.org.nz

Call for AGM motions / remits 

We would like to formally call for any motions or remits, these must be received by Monday 15th July 2019, 5pm. Please note there will be no elections for the Executive Committee at the 2019 AGM, as per the constitution elections are held every two years. The next election will be held at the 2020 AGM.

Registrations are now open for the joint Community Networks Aotearoa and NZ Council of Christian Social Services 2019 conference

  • Do you want to hear what the Minister of Social Development and other high profile Ministers/MPs have to say about better supporting the community sector?
  • Do you want to explore how community-based organisations can contribute to a sustained response to exclusion and discrimination following events in Christchurch?
  • Do you want to hear more about how community organisations can build meaningful, effective relationships with the people they serve and with each other?
  • Do you want to learn more about how the Government’s focus on wellbeing affects communities and community organisations?

All of this and more will be explored at the joint conference of Community Networks Aotearoa and NZ Council of Christian Social Services.

Quick facts

  • It’s on the 27th and 28th August in Wellington.
  • The conference is earlier than usual this year – it’s now only a couple of months away so please get in quick and register.
  • The theme this year is Tātou tātou e (all of us together): The value of relationships in building wellbeing.

CNA members may be able to access funding to help with conference expenses. If you are a CNA member and would like to learn more, please email info@communitynetworksaotearoa.org.nz.

To find out more, or register, click here.

Click here and listen to Ros interview Dr Ganesh Nana on budget 2019.

You can also listen to previous interviews, including Sarah Doherty, about  Navigator, Tracy Martin, Minister for Children, Seniors and Internal Affairs, Dave Henderson on the Charities Review and Jo Cribb on a governance project she’s involved with (along with CNA).

To blog, or not to blog…

Here are the links to the latest ComVoices blogs on Community Scoop. We recommend a browsing through these blogs. They are fascinating reading as always…

Government reforms/consultations 

Consultations 

  • The Climate Change Response (Zero Carbon) Amendment Bill is open for public consultation. The closing date for submissions is Tuesday, 16 July 2019, click here for more information.

Reforms to note

  • The Charities Act 2005 is being reviewed to ensure that it is effective and fit for purpose. Public consultation on the review recently closed, but you can keep up to date on the review here.
  • The Government is reviewing of the New Zealand Health and Disability Sector. For more information click here.
  • The Safe and Effective Justice Programme Advisory Group – Te Uepū Hāpai i te Ora – is working on long term solutions to improve community safety and the way justice works. They recently released the report He Waka Roimata (A Vessel of Tears) – it provides valuable insights into public attitudes and ideas about New Zealand’s justice system, To read the report and find out more click here.
  • Child Wellbeing Strategy – the strategy will commit Government to set and report on its actions to improve the wellbeing of all children and young people. For more information click here.
  • The Mental Health and Addiction Report has been released, for more information click here.

Campaigns / programmes / events

Do you or your organisation have a campaign or event you would like to highlight? If so send through a brief description to info@communitynetworksaotearoa.org.nz

  • Inclusive Aotearoa Collective is seeking to create a collaboration of people across the country committed to building a socially inclusive Aotearoa New Zealand. To achieve this vision, they will create a National Diversity and
    Inclusion Strategy that can bring diverse groups together in a way that will direct and empower communities to build and strengthen actions at the regional and local level. To get involved or find out more click here.
  • CPAG’s Welfare Fit for Families campaign is about building a welfare system based on principles of compassion and caring, and the real needs of families, without stressful over-emphasis on work, and punitive, corrective methods. More information can be found here.
  • CPAG and ActionStation have launched a petition calling for a welfare system which takes seriously the real needs of people, one that is truly compassionate and kind and cares about the dignity and mana of the people of Aotearoa when they are experiencing truly tough times. You can sign the petition here.
  • Join the call to stop loansharks and introduce an interest rate cap in the Credit Contracts Legislation Amendment Bill. Click here.
  • Strategic Grants have a number of online and face to face training opportunities coming up, which teach the best-practice processes, strategies and skills required to successfully and sustainably access grants funding for your projects. Learn more and book online at the links below.

    Evidence of Need: Intermediate Webinar
    Tue 18 Jun 2019 12:00 pm-12.45pm – $45 (Excl GST)
    The best grant applications provide evidence of the need and a rationale around why the grant project is expected to create outcomes. In this 45-minute webinar the webinar will show you the three levels of evidence you should be using in your grant applications.

    Wellington Grant-Seeker Workshop 
    Wed 10 Jul 2019 9:00 am-1pm – $200 (Excl GST)

    Auckland Grant-Seeker Workshop 
    Thu 25 Jul 2019 9:00 am-1pm – $200 (Excl GST)

Special offer just for members of Community Networks Aotearoa and their networks – because we think you’re great!

Facing an increase in your insurance premium? Then Community Networks Aotearoa in association with Rothbury Insurance Brokers can help!

This is a package specifically created for community groups and organisations, with extremely discounted rates.

We are pleased to offer this opportunity not only to our member organisations but to their members as well. If you, or one of your network organisations, are interested in receiving an obligation free quote, please contact us for the special code you will require and Rothbury’s contact details.

Network News – May 2019

Network News – May 2019

Network News May 2019

Community Networks Aotearoa is an umbrella organisation for local community networks. Our goal is to empower and strengthen the community sector by supporting community networks across Aotearoa.

We:

  • Provide advice and support to members
  • Connect community networks nationally
  • Use our collective voice to advocate for policy change and raise awareness of issues affecting the community sector

To find out more visit our website here.

This newsletter covers topical issues in the community sector. In this newsletter:

  • Update from CNA Executive Officer, Ros Rice
  • Guest column – Child Poverty Action Group
  • Meet the members: Pukete Neighbourhood House – Te Whare Takiwa o Pukete
  • Notice of CNA AGM
  • Charities Act review
  • IRD – update on changes
  • CNA and NZCCSS joint conference 27th and 28th Aug 2019
  • On Air
  • To blog, or not to blog
  • Government reforms/consultations
  • Campaigns / programmes / events
  • Special offer for members

We encourage you to send this newsletter our through your networks

Update from CNA Executive Officer, Ros Rice

Tēnā Koutou Katoa

Well the year is truly up and running now with lots happening. I know with so much going on it can be hard to get to everything you need to do, but if you haven’t already I strongly encourage you to submit on the Charities Act Review, you can find information on the review here. We will put our submission on our website shortly, and you are welcome to use the information in the submission to help you with your own submission, or you could write a letter in support of our submission. This review could have a significant impact on all charities so it’s really important as many people as possible feed into the review.

As many of you will know, the Welfare Expert Advisory Group report was made public recently. We thought the report did a great job, and commend the working group for their work. This month’s guest column is from CPAG, who provide commentary on the report. The CNA media release on the report can be found here.

I try and meet regularly with MPs to convey messages from our members and raise issues affecting the community sector. My latest meeting was with Peeni Henare, Minister for the Community and Voluntary Sector. I raised a number of issues, including the need for any review of COGs to have community input, and the importance of COGs funding for many in the community and voluntary sector. I also raised the issue that many in the sector are struggling, with limited funding and increasing demand. With the loss of Family and Community Services several years ago (a specific agency within government focused on the community sector), the sector now struggles to have its voice heard across government. While community is interwoven in all government does, having this separate entity helped to convey the important work of the sector and secure funding at budget time.

We will be watching with interest Budget 2019, and will have special commentary prepared by economist Dr Ganesh Nana on the budget and its impact on the community sector – watch this space!

Also a reminder that CNA and the NZ Council of Christian Social Services are holding our joint conference on the 27th and 28th August 2019 in Wellington. Everyone is welcome. The theme this year is Tātou tātou e (all of us together): The value of relationships in building wellbeing. To find out more or register, click here

And lastly, as always, remember we’re here to help. If you’re a member of CNA and have a problem or issue, or just need some information, please don’t hesitate to contact me on (04) 472 3364 or eo@communitynetworksaotearoa.org.nz. 

Guest column: Child Poverty Action Group: Commentary on the Welfare Expert Advisory Group Report 

Child Poverty Action Group welcomes the release of the long-anticipated report from the Welfare Expert Advisory Group (WEAG): Whakamana Tāngata: Restoring Dignity to Social Security in New Zealand.

The report shows the depth of the analysis that the group has undertaken in its consideration of improving support for people in Aotearoa who, in times of stress, illness and precarious incomes, rely on the welfare system for their families’ wellbeing needs.

It’s a remarkable endeavour with some really encouraging recommendations, particularly in terms of the report’s emphasis on dignity, income adequacy and assistance to provide each individual the opportunity to participate fully in society. CPAG is particularly pleased to note a vast cultural and philosophical shift around the purpose and intent of welfare, away from the current punitive regime that has become the tragic norm, and toward one that is based on compassion, kindness and empathy. The focus on meeting individual needs, rather than simply ticking boxes will go a long way to minimise the stresses we know that people who regularly interact with Work and Income (WINZ) experience.

CPAG prepared 17 practical recommendations toward having Welfare Fit for Families in the 21st century, and is pleased to note that the WEAG report has considered many of the problems CPAG has highlighted.

Among the WEAG recommendations are solutions to make the system less punitive, especially for families where there are dependent children, as well as solutions for improving income adequacy, through increasing payments, thresholds and reducing abatements, as well as indexation. CPAG welcomes these recommendations, which require urgent implementation.

While CPAG welcomes the majority of the report, we are disappointed that the report’s projected impacts on the numbers of children in poverty are less than the ambitious goal of eradicating child poverty altogether. The report projects that it will reduce the number of children currently living in households with less than 50% of before housing costs (BHC) median equivalised income, by 45,000 (or 40%).

CPAG remains very concerned about the impacts for those who are living with incomes far beneath the very lowest poverty line, who are likely to be supported by a main benefit. CPAG has also taken a different approach to the WEAG group on the Accommodation Supplement that will be outlined in an upcoming report from CPAG. The report’s focus on housing is commendable, as it reinforces the negative impact that the current lack of affordable housing options has on the family income, but there are deep inadequacies within the Accommodation Supplement that among other problems, feed market price increases.

The Minister of Social Development, Hon. Carmel Sepuloni expressed that work towards making improvements to the welfare system had been started since in her Government’s first term with changes within WINZ offices, and that a three-to- five-year plan would be developed for implementation of many further changes. Minister Sepuloni’s pre-Budget announcements signaled a start, but were unremarkable, and did not signal the courageous, transformational change that CPAG and many others had hoped for from a “Wellbeing Budget”. For example, the increase in earned income thresholds for benefit abatement rates, especially as it is implemented over a long period of time, is minimal and not nearly close to being adequate. We can’t see how this makes it any easier for people on main benefits to obtain sufficient work to help them into better positions, or improve their incomes in the short term.

The paltly expenditure announced by the Government – ‘investment’ the Government calls it – of $286.8 million over the next four years, is only a scratch on what is needed for major reductions in child poverty, which the Government claims is their aim. $5.2 billion dollars a year is needed to fix our welfare system so that it is adequate and fit for purpose, catching it up three decades of falling behind costs and entrenching the poverty that we see today. A government serious about making a real difference in the lives of children, must make a serious investment today, to save money in the future. It must create a fairer economy and bolster future generations so that they have the means to be able to participate fully in society. The so-called investment announced by the Government is by no means transformational change.

We believe it’s important to keep the pressure on Government to make changes that are truly transformational and urgently needed. Join us in our campaign for a welfare system that works. Help CPAG and ActionStation tell the Government we want a welfare system which takes seriously the real needs of people, one that is truly compassionate and kind and cares about the dignity and mana of the people of Aotearoa when they are experiencing truly tough times. Sign our petition now supporting CPAG’s recommendations – which are reflected in the Welfare Expert Advisory Group’s report – calling for a welfare system that has wellbeing at it’s heart.

From time to time CNA invites individuals to contribute to our newsletter as a guest columnist. The thoughts, ideas and opinions shared by guest columnists are not necessarily those of CNA. 

Meet the members: Pukete Neighbourhood House – Te Whare Takiwa o Pukete

Pukete Neighbourhood House – Te Whare Takiwa o Pukete provides a range of classes, services, facilities, programmes and events to help our local community. We are part of a vibrant, dynamic community and work to ensure everyone in the community feels they belong and are connected – both to each other and services they may need. We make sure Pukete House has something for everyone. 

Our services are diverse, ranging from free legal advice, a vege co-op, playgroups, child care, craft groups, an indoor sports arena and a family support worker to hire services. Our classes include Tai Chi and scone Wednesday.

To help build a picture of what we do, a total of 120,003 people were served by Pukete House last year. 147 people in the community gave their time to support the House and their community. 650 people attended a class or event and nearly 26,000 children attended a before and after school, or holiday, programme.

Pukete Neighbourhood House was started 34 years ago in response to a University study that showed Pukete had no place for people to meet and socialize. This was important, because we know it’s the relationships and connections between people that make a significant difference to individual and community wellbeing.

The Council provided a small house and a committee was formed to run what is now known as the Pukete Neighbourhood House. Early on the House was run on a very ad hoc basis, really only when someone wanted to run a course etc.

As time went on members of the committee took turns opening the House from 10am to 2pm on a couple of days a week. It soon became apparent that if the House was to grow and prosper there was going to have to be someone there on a regular basis. Funding was applied for and a manager appointed. This gave much more permanence and the whole organisation began to grow.

Over time Pukete House has continued to grow. We are recognised as one of the most successful community house’s in the Waikato, and we use our experience to help other Houses grow.

To find out more click here.

Notice of Community Networks Aotearoa AGM 

The Community Networks Aotearoa (CNA) AGM will be held on Wednesday 28th August 8am, at Westpac Stadium 105 Waterloo Quay, Pipitea, Wellington.

The AGM is an important part of our organisation’s democracy so we encourage you to come along, especially if you’re a member.

The AGM is being held at the joint CNA and NZ Council of Christian Social Services conference. We hope you are able to stay for the full conference, but if you can only stay for the AGM you are not required to register for the conference to attend the AGM (there is no cost to attend the AGM).

If you are intending to attend the conference, you can register for the conference and AGM together here.

If you wish to attend the AGM only, you can register by emailing info@communitynetworksaotearoa.org.nz

Call for AGM motions / remits 

We would like to formally call for any motions or remits, these must be received by Monday 15th July 2019, 5pm. Please note there will be no elections for the Executive Committee at the 2019 AGM, as per the constitution elections are held every two years. The next election will be held at the 2020 AGM.

Important – Charities Act Review 

The Charities Act 2005 is being reviewed to ensure that it is effective and fit for purpose. The consultation period has been extended to 31 May. More information on the review can be found here.

We have some useful information on our website, including blogs and research papers going over key issues, click here.

IRD – update on changes 

On 26 April, the latest changes as part of IRD’s programme to make tax more straightforward came into effect. You can read an update on what to expect over the coming months here.

Save the date! 2019 CNA and NZ Council of Christian Social Services joint conference 27th and 28th August 2019

CNA and the NZ Council of Christian Social Services are holding our joint conference on the 27th and 28th August 2019 in Wellington. Everyone is welcome. The theme this year is Tātou tātou e (all of us together): The value of relationships in building wellbeing. You can find out more and register by clicking here.

The conference will explore questions such as:

  • How can community organisations build meaningful, effective relationships with the people they serve and with each other?
  • How will the government’s Wellbeing Budget affect communities and community organisations?
  • How can spirituality enhance the wellbeing of older people?

We have an amazing line of speakers, including Professor Cynthia (Cindy) Kiro (Ngapuhi, Ngati Kahu, Ngati Hine), Sacha McMeeking, University of Canterbury, Head of School – Aotahi / Māui Lab Co-Director, Peeni Henare, Minister of Community and Voluntary Sector, Kath Harrison, Chief Executive, Belong Blue Mountains Community and Neighbourhood Services Australia, Damon Salesa, University of Auckland Associate Professor of Pacific Studies and Pro Vice-Chancellor (Pacific) and Panapa Ehau, Director of Hikurangi Enterprises.

CNA members may be able to access funding to help with conference expenses. If you are a CNA member and would like to learn more, please email info@communitynetworksaotearoa.org.nz

To find out more, or register, click here.

Click here and listen to Ros and co-host Sarah Saunders interview Hon Tracy Martin, Minister for Children, Seniors and Internal Affairs.

You can also listen to previous interviews, including Dave Henderson on the Charities Review and Jo Cribb on a governance project she’s involved in (along with CNA).

To blog, or not to blog…

Here are the links to the latest ComVoices blogs on Community Scoop. We recommend a browsing through these blogs. They are fascinating reading as always…

Government reforms/consultations 

Current consultations

  • Important – The Charities Act 2005 is being reviewed to ensure that it is effective and fit for purpose. The consultation period has been extended to 31 May. Have your say here.
  • The Government has announced a review of the New Zealand Health and Disability Sector. The review is keen to hear your thoughts on what system level changes could improve the performance of our health and disability system. For more information click here.
  • Consultation is open on a new strategy for an ageing population – Better Later Life – He Oranga Kaumātua 2019 to 2034. Consultation closes midnight 3 June 2019. To find out more click here.

Other reforms to note

  • The Welfare Expert Advisory Group is advising on the future of the welfare system. The Group’s report is now publicly available – more information can be found here.
  • The Safe and Effective Justice Programme Advisory Group – Te Uepū Hāpai i te Ora – is working on long term solutions to improve community safety and the way justice works. Find out more here.
  • Child Wellbeing Strategy – the strategy will commit Government to set and report on its actions to improve the wellbeing of all children and young people. For more information click here.
  • The Tax Working Group is examining the structure, fairness and balance of New Zealand’s tax system. The Government has now received the Group’s final report – more information and the report can be found here.
  • The Local Government (Community Well-being) Amendment Bill has passed into law. This Bill restored four aspects of community wellbeing in legislation (social, economic, environmental and cultural). For more information click here.
  • The Mental Health and Addiction Report has been released, the Government is yet to formally respond. For more information click here.
  • The Government is considering the establishment of a sector-level bargaining system. This would enable unions and employers to develop Fair Pay Agreements that set minimum terms and conditions for all workers in an entire industry or occupation. The Government has established the Fair Pay Agreement Working Group to make recommendations on the design of this system. The Working Group has released its recommendations. For more information click here.

Campaigns / programmes / events

Do you or your organisation have a campaign or event you would like to highlight? If so send through a brief description to info@communitynetworksaotearoa.org.nz

  • UNICEF NZ has launched Te Hiringa Tamariki, a new wellbeing model that explores wellbeing across four domains: Atua (religion and spirituality), Pakanga (connections, especially amongst whānau), Te Ao (navigating two cultures or worlds) and Ihi (arts, literature, culture and sport). The model is based on interactions with 500 Māori rangatahi. Find out more here.
  • CPAG’s Welfare Fit for Families campaign is about building a welfare system based on principles of compassion and caring, and the real needs of families, without stressful over-emphasis on work, and punitive, corrective methods. More information can be found here.
  • CPAG and ActionStation have launched a petition calling for a welfare system which takes seriously the real needs of people, one that is truly compassionate and kind and cares about the dignity and mana of the people of Aotearoa when they are experiencing truly tough times. You can sign the petition here.
  • CPAG is holding nationwide post budget events – click here to find out more.
  • Join the call to stop loansharks and introduce an interest rate cap in the Credit Contracts Legislation Amendment Bill. Click here.

Things to note before you go

Community Accounting Aotearoa is a free service which offers support, advice or assistance on financial matters.

How Community Accounting Aotearoa can help

Community groups within New Zealand are able to access this service free of charge.

  • Community Accounting Aotearoa provides community groups outside the main centres with free assistance on financial matters.
  • Teams made up of senior accounting students will provide support using digital technology software such as Zoom and Adobe Connect.
  • Community groups require only an internet connection and a computer with a camera.
  • The students are supervised by volunteer Chartered Accountants.

For more information contact Geoff – geoff@ancad.org.nz or phone 021 054 6240

Special offer just for members of Community Networks Aotearoa and their networks – because we think you’re great!

Facing an increase in your insurance premium? Then Community Networks Aotearoa in association with Rothbury Insurance Brokers can help!

This is a package specifically created for community groups and organisations, with extremely discounted rates.

We are pleased to offer this opportunity not only to our member organisations but to their members as well. If you, or one of your network organisations, are interested in receiving an obligation free quote, please contact us for the special code you will require and Rothbury’s contact details.

Media release – Need for action urgent – many can’t wait another year

Media release
Community Networks Aotearoa

3 May 2019

Need for action urgent – many can’t wait another year

Community Networks Aotearoa welcomes the release of the Whakamana Tāngata: Restoring Dignity to Social Security in New Zealand report. It presents a blueprint for resetting our welfare system so that everyone in this country has what they need to live with dignity and participate in their community.

“Our welfare system has been failing people for some time. This is clear when we’re dealing with 254,000 children living in poverty.

“We really need the Government to step up and implement the report in full. For too long we’ve seen successive governments tinker around the edges of welfare support, but meaningful change requires transformation across a range of areas, as laid out in the Whakamana Tāngata: Restoring Dignity to Social Security in New Zealand report” says Ros Rice, Community Networks Aotearoa Chief Executive.

“We are disappointed that only three recommendations are being picked up now, and that they will not come into effect for another year”.

The report highlights restoring trust in the system for Maori and Pacific Island people plus 42 recommendations around a range of issues. “We will be taking our time reading this report so that we are clear about all the recommendations and how they will affect the lives of our most vulnerable people” Ms Rice says.

“We’re hearing more and more that the need for change is urgent, people are really struggling, and many services are struggling to deal with increasing demand. We need to see major change now, it can’t wait any longer. The Wellbeing Budget to be released later this month must commit the resources to begin the transformation required. People needing support cannot wait another year.

“There is a lot to do to implement the findings of the report, however across Aotearoa our communities are rich with important insights, experience and knowledge about what can work. We hope in implementing the recommendations the Government creates space for meaningful conversations with community about what can be done, bringing everyone to the table” says Ros.

Community Networks Aotearoa is an umbrella organisation for local community networks. Our membership includes not-for-profit and voluntary social service organisations all over the country. Our goal is to empower and strengthen the community sector by supporting community networks across Aotearoa.

Photo: bruceandrobyn